Posted on

Warwick university english and creative writing

English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

**Why Warwick?**The University of Warwick is a world-leading university, born out of boldness, imagination and collaboration. We’ve built a strong reputation for upholding the highest academic and research standards.Today, more than 27,000 students thrive in a supportive, welcoming space where everything you need to study, live and have fun is close to hand. Explore what Warwick has to offer, and you’ll develop a skillset that sets you apart, and sets you up to succeed. What that success looks . READ MORE

**Why Warwick?**The University of Warwick is a world-leading university, born out of boldness, imagination and collaboration. We’ve built a strong reputation for upholding the highest academic and research standards.Today, more than 27,000 students thrive in a supportive, welcoming space where everything you need to study, live and have fun is close to hand. Explore what Warwick has to offer, and you’ll develop a skillset that sets you apart, and sets you up to succeed. What that success looks like is up to you.**The course**Creative work can happen anywhere, but you can learn the craft of writing and enjoy working with other young writers in a place of energy and new ideas in our new School of Creative Arts, Performance and Visual Cultures.If you intend to pursue a career as an author, or to work in the creative industries or teaching, this practical course will teach you about the creative writing process and help you become a better reader, with a deeper understanding of literary theories and texts. You will be taught by practising and award-winning writers, bridging the gap between academic and creative approaches to literature. Our course is number one for creative writing in the UK (Times/Sunday Times University Guide 2021) and number three in the Complete University Guide 2021.You will undertake real-world writing tasks and will regularly meet, engage with and learn from industry professionals, including publishers, editors, literary agents, poets and authors. Our graduates leave with advanced communicative, imaginative and critical abilities, plus practical and vocational literary writing skills including composition, interpretation and evaluation. In addition, you will develop argument, analysis and debating skills, and a capacity for independent thought. Many of our graduates have become professional writers, poets, dramatists, filmmakers, and performers.

English Literature and Creative Writing BA (UCAS QW38)

Learn more about our English Literature and Creative Writing degree at Warwick

Studying English Literature and Creative Writing (BA) at Warwick will transform your understanding of literature, of yourself, and of the world. It will also fully prepare you to thrive in any profession that values intellectual rigour, creativity, and the ability to communicate a message that matters.

General entry requirements

A levels
A level typical offer

AAA or A*AB to include grade A in English Literature or English Language and Literature (combined).

A level contextual offer

We welcome applications from candidates who meet the contextual eligibility criteria and whose predicted grades are close to, or slightly below, the contextual offer level. The typical contextual offer is ABB, including A in English Literature or English Language and Literature (combined). See if you’re eligible.

General GCSE requirements

Unless specified differently above, you will also need a minimum of GCSE grade 4 or C (or an equivalent qualification) in English Language and either Mathematics or a Science subject. Find out more about our entry requirements and the qualifications we accept. We advise that you also check the English Language requirements for your course which may specify a higher GCSE English requirement. Please find the information about this below.

IB typical offer

38 to include 6 at Higher Level in English Literature or combined English Language and Literature.

IB contextual offer

We welcome applications from candidates who meet the contextual eligibility criteria and whose predicted grades are close to, or slightly below, the contextual offer level. The typical contextual offer is 34 including grade 6 in Higher Level English Literature or English Language and Literature (combined). See if you’re eligible.

General GCSE requirements

Unless specified differently above, you will also need a minimum of GCSE grade 4 or C (or an equivalent qualification) in English Language and either Mathematics or a Science subject. Find out more about our entry requirements and the qualifications we accept. We advise that you also check the English Language requirements for your course which may specify a higher GCSE English requirement. Please find the information about this below.

We welcome applications from students taking BTECs alongside A level English Literature or English Language and Literature (combined).

General GCSE requirements

Unless specified differently above, you will also need a minimum of GCSE grade 4 or C (or an equivalent qualification) in English Language and either Mathematics or a Science subject. Find out more about our entry requirements and the qualifications we accept. We advise that you also check the English Language requirements for your course which may specify a higher GCSE English requirement. Please find the information about this below.

International qualifications

Language requirements

All applicants have to meet our English Language requirements . If you cannot demonstrate that you meet these, you may be invited to take part in our Pre-sessional English course at Warwick .

Frequently asked questions

Contextual data and differential offers

Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in a Widening Participation programme or who meet the contextual data criteria.

Differential offers will usually be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer.

Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP)

All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only).

Taking a gap year

We welcome applications for deferred entry.

Interviews

We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

Course overview

Creative work can happen anywhere, but you can learn the craft of writing and enjoy working with other emerging writers in a place of energy and ideas in our School of Creative Arts, Performance and Visual Cultures.

If you intend to pursue a career as an author, or to work in the creative industries or teaching, this practical course will teach you about the creative writing process and help you become a better reader, with a deeper understanding of literary history, literary theory and the past and future of publishing. You will be taught by practising and award-winning writers, bridging the gap between academic and creative approaches to literature. Our course is number one for creative writing in the UK (Times/Sunday Times University Guide 2021) and number two in the Complete University Guide 2022.

You will undertake real-world writing tasks and will regularly meet, engage with, and learn from industry professionals, including publishers, editors, literary agents, poets, and authors. Our graduates enter the world with advanced communicative, imaginative, and critical abilities, plus practical and vocational literary writing skills including composition, interpretation, and evaluation. In addition, you will develop argument, analysis and speaking skills, and a capacity for independent thought. Many of our graduates have become professional writers, poets, dramatists, filmmakers, and performers.

Study abroad

As a student on our English degrees, you will have the opportunity to spend your third year at one of our partner institutions in Europe, China, or the USA. You will then return to Warwick to complete your fourth and final year of your degree.

You will be able to apply to transfer to the four-year course when you are in your second year at Warwick, subject to availability of places from the University’s International Office.

Core modules

In your first year you will gain the foundation you need to become a better reader and writer. In Modes of Writing, we explore writing in different forms, including poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and writing for performance and new media. Through studying Medieval to Renaissance English Literature, you will appreciate the context of contemporary beliefs and social developments. Epic into Novel will give you an understanding of some of the great texts of classical and modern times. And our new module The Written World will introduce you to some of the ideas and themes in literary theory, with a particular focus on texts that are important to writers.

As a second year you will progress to Composition and Creative Writing, in which you explore and deepen your practice of fiction and non-fiction. You will take a module from before 1900, as well as any module from English Literature, Creative Writing, or another University department.

In your final year you will progress to the Personal Writing Project, your opportunity to work one-to-one with a tutor of your choice on an extensive piece of writing in fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, screenwriting, or a genre of your choice. In addition, you will select a global literature module, as well as any module from English Literature, Creative Writing, or another University department.

Year One

Modes of Writing

This is a core module for first-year undergraduates reading for the degree QW38 English Literature and Creative Writing. The module is 100% fully assessed. The module complements The Written World and prepares you for the more specialist writing modules in years two and three such as Composition and Creative Writing, The Practice of Poetry, The Practice of Fiction and The Personal Writing Project. The module also complements other academic optional modules in which writing, imitation, rhetoric or translation may be practised or studied.

Read more about this module Link opens in a new window , including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).

Medieval and Early Modern Literature

Taking you from the mythical court of King Arthur to the real world of ambition, intrigue, and danger in the courts of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, this module introduces you to early literature written in a range of genres (romance, epic, fabliau) and poetic forms. You will study texts like Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Thomas More’s Utopia, Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare’s sonnets to explore some of the period’s highest ideals—‘trawthe’ or integrity—as well as some of humanity’s darkest impulses: greed, deception, revenge, and desire.

Read more about this module Link opens in a new window , including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2022/23 year of study).

Epic into Novel

Tracking the transition from the epics of the ancient world to the novels of modernity, this module introduces you to some of the most influential and formative works of world literature. You will study central texts of the classical world, such as Homer’s Iliad and Virgil’s Aeneid; the ancient Indian epic The Mahābhārata; Milton’s Paradise Lost; as well as novels like Henry Fielding’s bawdy comedy Tom Jones and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o’s novel of decolonising Kenya, A Grain of Wheat. Reading across history and cultures, between languages and genres, you will develop the skills to analyse narrative, character, and style.

Read more about this module Link opens in a new window , including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).

The Written World

This module will introduce students on the BA in English Literature and Creative Writing to ideas and theories from literary studies, linguistics, critical theory, translation studies and cultural studies that will underpin more specialised scholarly and creative study in the second and third years.

Read more about this module Link opens in a new window , including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).

Year Two

Composition and Creative Writing

You will develop your fiction writing through practice of the processes involved, from inception, through drafting and revision, to considerations of audience. You will gain insights into narrative form, including traditional and experimental methods.

Read more about this module Link opens in a new window , including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).

Year Three

Personal Writing Project

The Personal Writing Project will see you working closely with a practitioner to advance your technical and critical skills in the development of a portfolio of work focused on a specific genre. You will gain an appreciation of the research and methodology needed for large-scale creative works and in so doing, gain the maturity and confidence to advance your career as a professional writer.

Read more about this module, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).

Optional modules

Optional modules can vary from year to year. Example optional modules may include:

  • The Practice of Poetry
  • The Practice of Fiction
  • Screenwriting
  • Advanced Screenwriting
  • US Writing and Culture 1780-1920
  • Romantic and Victorian Poetry
  • The Seventeenth Century
  • Game Theory: Interactive and Video Game Narratives

Assessment

Assessment is a combination of creative projects, portfolios, essays, and performance. For example, in our Shakespeare and Selected Dramatists of his Time module, student creative work recently included film and radio adaptations, musical compositions, painting, sculpture and photography inspired by Shakespeare’s texts.

Teaching

Practising writers deliver teaching through workshops and seminars. Also, writers and publishers visit and work with you in our Creative Writing Studio. Most core modules in your first year are taught through lectures and seminars. In your second and third years, optional modules are normally taught in seminars and workshops.

Working together, we seek to improve our students’ skills and confidence through writing workshops, peer review and live performances. You will be encouraged to attend and participate at spoken word events in the local area.

Class sizes

Targeted teaching with class sizes of 10 – 15 students (on average).

Typical contact hours

Guided learning of typically eight contact hours per week. Seminars are usually 1.5 hours each.

Tuition fees

Tuition fees cover the majority of the costs of your study, including teaching and assessment. Fees are charged at the start of each academic year. If you pay your fees directly to the University, you can choose to pay in instalments.

Home students

Undergraduate fees

If you are a home student enrolling in 2022, your annual tuition fees will be £9,250. In the future, these fees might change for new and continuing students.

2+2 course fees

If you are a home student enrolling in 2022 for a 2+2 course through the Centre for Lifelong Learning, your annual tuition fees will be £6,750. In the future, these fees might change for new and continuing students.