Posted on

Primary homework help anderson shelters

Primary homework help anderson shelters

Special Days Every Month

Celebrate and learn about special days
every day of the year!

On 25 February 1939, the first Anderson shelter was ereted in Britain in a garden in Islington, London.

What were Anderson Shelters?

Anderson shelters were half buried in the ground with earth heaped on top to protect people from bomb blasts during World War Two.

© The Imperial War Museum

They were made from six corrugated iron sheets bolted together at the top, with steel plates at either end, and measured 6ft 6in by 4ft 6in (1.95m by 1.35m). The entrance was protected by a steel shield and an earthen blast wall.

An Anderson shelter not buried

© Copyright – please read
All the materials on these pages are free for homework and classroom use only. You may not redistribute, sell or place the content of this page on any other website or blog without written permission from the Mandy Barrow.
projectbritain.com | primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk

Mandy is the creator of the Woodlands Resources section of the Woodlands Junior website.
The two websites projectbritain.com and primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk
are the new homes for the Woodlands Resources.

Mandy left Woodlands in 2003 to work in Kent schools as an ICT Consulatant.
She now teaches computers at The Granville School and St. John’s Primary School in Sevenoaks Kent.

born on this day what happened on this day famous birthdays interesting facts did you know Interesting Calendar Facts.

Primary homework help anderson shelters

How did the War affect people’s everyday lives?

During the war life changed for everybody, including children. For most children, the war years were a time of anxiety. For many, it was a period of family separation. For some, it was a time of profound personal loss.

Many children had to grow up quickly during wartime. Many children had to look after themselves and younger siblings while their mothers worked.

Nearly two million children were evacuated from their homes at the start of World War Two. They were evacuated to the countryside to escape the bombing.

Children had labels attached to them, as though they were parcels. They stood at railway station not knowing where they were going nor if they would be split from brothers and sisters who had gathered with them. They felt scared about being away from their families and had to adjust to new schools and make new friends.

Find out why children were evacuated, and where evacuees were sent on our evacuation page.

Children experienced a restricted diet because of rationing.

Find out what things were rationed, including sweets on our rationing page.

Children lived in fear from the constant threat of air raids. They spent some nights living in air raid shelters just in case German planes dropped bombs on their houses. Their fears came true during the blitz. One in ten of the deaths during the Blitz of London from 1940 to 1941 were children.

The government thought that children under five would be scared of the gas masks so they produced a specially designed Micky Mouse gas mask. It was brightly coloured in red and blue.

Children had to take regular gas drills at school. They found these drills hard to take seriously, especially when they discovered blowing through the rubber made ‘rude’ noises.

The war had an affect on the kind of rhymes children told and the games they played.

Games children played

How many of the games above do you recognise?

A Wartime diary

Written by one of our students.
We asked our Year 6’s to imagine what it was like to be a child during the war and to write a diary as though they were adults reflecting back on their experiences. Read the diary here

Anne Frank and other Jews

Many children and their parents living in countries which had been invaded by the Germans were imprisoned and killed because they were Jewish.

Anne Frank was a German Jewish girl whose family was under attack.

© Copyright – please read
All the materials on these pages are free for homework and classroom use only. You may not redistribute, sell or place the content of this page on any other website or blog without written permission from the author Mandy Barrow.

Primary homework help anderson shelters

Britain Since the 1930s

The first German air attack took place in London on the evening of 7 September 1940. Within months, Liverpool, Birmingham, Coventry and other cities were hit too.

Why were Air Raid Shelters built?

People needed to protect themselves from the bombs being dropped by German aircraft.

As the night raids became so frequent, many people who were tired of repeatedly interrupting their sleep to go back and forth to the shelters, virtually took up residence in a shelter.

What were Anderson Shelters?

These shelters were half buried in the ground with earth heaped on top to protect them from bomb blasts.

© The Imperial War Museum

They were made from six corrugated iron sheets bolted together at the top, with steel plates at either end, and measured 6ft 6in by 4ft 6in (1.95m by 1.35m). The entrance was protected by a steel shield and an earthen blast wall.

An Anderson shelter not buried.

The government gave out anderson shelters free to people who earned below £5 per week. By September 1939 one and a half million Anderson shelters had been put up in gardens.

What were Anderson Shelters like?

The Anderson Shelters were dark and damp and people were reluctant to use them at night.

In low-lying areas the shelters tended to flood and sleeping was difficult as they did not keep out the sound of the bombings.

How much did they cost?

Anderson shelters were given free to poor people. Men who earned more than £5 a week could buy one for £7.

When was the Morrison Shelter first introduced?

The Morrison Shelter was introduced in March 1941, for people without gardens. The shelter, made from heavy steel, could also be used as a table. People sheltered underneath it during a raid. The Morrison shelter was named after the Minister for Home Security, Mr. Herbert Morrison.

The Morrison shelter was approximately 6 feet 6 inches (2m) long, 4 feet (1.2m) wide and 2 feet 6 inches (0.75m) high.

Places used as shelters

What other places were used as air raid shelters?

By the autumn of 1940 the government realised that air-raid shelters on the surface did not offer very good protection from high explosive bombs. Deeper shelters were used.

Caves were used in many parts of Britain.

On September 21, 1940 the London Underground started to be used as an air raid shelter. On the busiest night in 1940, 177,000 people slept on platforms. Many bought sandwiches, thermos flasks, pillows and blankets.

Further information

Memories of in the school air raid shelter
We had to carry a gas mask which was issued in a cardboard box with a piece of string to sling over your shoulder. Air raid shelters were built at the bottom of the playground where once we had practised our Hiawatha rabbit skin curing skills.

© Copyright – please read
All the materials on these pages are free for homework and classroom use only. You may not redistribute, sell or place the content of this page on any other website or blog without written permission from the author Mandy Barrow.