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How to Write a CV Personal Statement [+4 Real-life Examples]

Creating an effective CV takes time and close attention to detail. You’ve already included your jobs and experience, and now you want to allow the recruiter or hiring manager to understand the strategic value you can add.

This is when you need to utilize a personal statement at the top of your CV.

How to Write a CV Personal Statement [+4 Real-life Examples]

What is a Personal Statement?

A personal statement is a few brief and direct sentences at the top of your CV. The personal statement is also referred to as a career summary or personal mission statement.

This is used to grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and summarizes essential experiences or training that you can bring to this position.

Why do I Need a Personal Statement?

A recruiter or hiring manager is tasked with sorting through an enormous amount of resumes every single day. A personal statement is a way to separate yourself from the other applicants.

This statement summarizes your experience and highlights your unique talents. The CV personal statement is meant to demonstrate why you are the perfect fit for the job.

Even med students need a medical school personal statement, as it is what differentiates them from all the other students applying. Plus, it allows them to share their personal stories and objectives.

Where do I Start?

Always begin by reading the job description carefully and thoroughly.

Your personal statement should be tailored to each job description, so it explicitly states the value you’ll bring to the position you are applying. A generic personal statement cannot do that.

Once you have a solid handle on the job description, you can begin writing. It’s important to keep your personal statement brief, about 50-200 words will do.

Don’t forget that you have your whole cover letter to show some personality and include engaging content.

The personal statement should be a quick summary that highlights why you are the best person for the job.

You’ll need to decide whether you are writing your personal statement in first- or third-person. This should follow how you’ve written the rest of your CV.

For example, if you’ve already written, “I grew and developed a team of 50 salespeople,” in your CV then you will want to keep your personal statement in first-person to match the prevailing style.

No matter what you choose, make sure that you keep it consistent throughout. Do not switch between first- and third-person as that will get confusing to the hiring manager.

Writing a personal statement for your CV in first-person does not mean you need to start every sentence with “I.”

There are ways to craft your personal statement to sound snappy, concise and personal, and here are a few examples to help inspire your personal statement.

CV Personal Statement Examples

It doesn’t matter what chose as your desired career or how much experience you have, use these examples to drive the creation of your own personal statement.

You can take snippets from each or write something completely different. Always remember that your personal statement is a reflection of yourself and should align with your own personal goals and experience.

If these examples don’t fit your exact career, feel free to take some pointers and write yours from scratch.

#1: Personal Statement Example for Recent Graduate CV

“As a recent graduate from university, with an honors degree in communications, I held several internships within leading organizations, including Bertelsmann. These internships enabled me to gain experience in the field and learn how to serve up valuable contributions in a fast-paced, professional environment.”

Explanation: This example should be customized to include the university you’ve graduated from and any relevant internships. A compelling personal statement always highlights relevant skills and experiences.

In this case, a recent graduate does not have extensive experience in the workforce, so soft skills like experiencing success in a fast-paced work environment and becoming a trusted team member become even more critical.

#2: Personal Statement Example for Returning to the Workforce CV

“A highly motivated and experienced office administrator, I am currently looking to resume my professional career after an extended hiatus to raise my family. Proficient in all Microsoft Office programs, I can lead meetings and work with clients to keep your office running smoothly and efficiently. After spending several years volunteering as an administrative worker for a local charity, I am committed to resuming my professional career on a full-time basis.”

Explanation: After time off from a career, it can be hard to break back into the market. This personal statement outlines the reason for the break, the relevant qualifications and what the applicant has been doing in between jobs.

Any volunteer experience becomes highly relevant when there is no concrete professional experience to draw upon, to demonstrate the use of those skills.

#3: Personal Statement Example for a Career Change CV

“With over 15 years as a sales manager, I have extensive experience building high-functioning sales teams that consistently achieve budget numbers. In fact, my ability to grow talent led to a 20% increase in annual renewals across the board. Now, after 15 years, I am seeking new challenges to flex my marketing muscles in a fast-paced environment.”

Explanation: When changing careers, it’s essential to highlight skills that are transferable between industries.

In this case, leadership and team-building experience can apply to any industry. Homing in on concrete numbers and percentages increases credibility when applying for a position.

The applicant ends with the reason behind the desired career change. This part is not necessary but may be appealing to some hiring managers who are wondering what the impetus for the career change.

#4: Personal Statement Example for a Experienced Professional CV

“As a friendly, professional and highly trained educator, I am passionate about teaching and have an innate ability to understand student’s needs. Creating a safe and productive environment for optimal learning is my top priority. I’ve worked as a teacher for nearly 10 years in a variety of subjects and my experience and skill set make me the perfect fit for your team.”

Explanation: With more experience comes more skills and a better idea of strengths and weaknesses. Showcasing your passion for the industry is a great way to begin a personal statement, as it shows the hiring manager your dedication to the craft.

Conclusion

A personal statement can be written in many different ways, but it is ultimately up to you to determine what skills you want to highlight for your chosen position.

You can follow these examples or take learnings from each to contribute towards your personal statement.

If you understand the job you are applying for and know the unique skill set that you bring to the table, you will have a stellar personal statement for your CV that will get you across the table from the hiring manager in no time.

How to write a personal profile for your CV in 2022

in yet another year of uncertainty ad with record numbers of jobs available, many people are choosing to re-think their career options for 2022. If this is you, now is the perfect time to spruce up your CV ready for your job search. And a personal profile could set you up for success.

Putting together the core information of your CV, such as education and employment history, is a fairly easy task.

While you may think these are all you need to market yourself effectively, you should probably add an introductory profile too. This will give your CV the extra oomph it needs to secure that job in 2022.

What is a personal profile?

A personal profile, otherwise known as a personal statement, CV profile or perhaps even a career aim, is essentially the blurb of your career portfolio.

This small paragraph sits at the top of your CV. It concisely and effectively displays who you are, your skills and strengths relevant to the sector or job role and your career goals.

Sounds like quite a mouthful, but personal statements are no problem to write, we promise. They’re actually really similar to cover letters. Except, you’ll be selling your best points to a potential employer in about four sentences, rather than an A4 page.

So, if you’ve spent all this time jazzing up your CV to hook, line and sinker that recruiter in your New Year job search, adding a personal profile ensures they grab the bait.

Not sure what a personal profile looks like? Check out these five winning examples.

Is a personal profile necessary in 2022?

Personal profiles are widely debated across the industry. Some experts claim you need one to sell your skills and others suggest they’re a waste of valuable space.

The short answer is you don’t need to have a personal statement. However, recruiters have to sift through several application to find potential applicants. This means its vital that your CV is able to stand out right from the start.

There are some genuine reasons why you might not choose to have a personal statement. But, it shouldn’t be that you can’t be bothered to write one! It actually depends on your job search status. If you’re applying for a specific job role and attaching a cover letter to your CV, you may actively choose not to have a personal statement.

As we’ve already mentioned, your cover letter is going to do a lot of the talking for you. So, you may feel it’s best not to have another summary. Saying that, the whole point of a CV is to market yourself. Therefore, if you can include another piece of advertising, then why not?

If you’re a graduate, then it might be best to leave the professional side of the personal statement at bay. Only until you’ve gained some more work experience. Simply highlight the fact you’ve got a degree and outline the career path you’d like to follow.

While it’s not a bad thing to share your ambitions with recruiters, you’ll probably find the word count could be better spent discussing your final year project in more depth. Just when you thought you’d never have to talk about your final year dissertation again!

If, however, you’ve chalked up strengths and experiences during your time at university that anchor you to the job you’re applying for, you should highlight these in your personal statement, and make it clear to the recruiter that you will excel in this job role.

Personal profiles are also particularly handy if you’re trying to enter a competitive sector such as PR, advertising, film, music and publishing. As you can imagine, recruiters from these fields deal with hundreds of CVs on a regular basis. So, they’ll simply flick past your CV unless they spot that competitive edge.

Personal profiles are the perfect way for you to grab their attention and persuade recruiters to continue reading your CV because you’re telling them from the off exactly why they should hire you. Of course, you’ll need to know how to write an effective statement first, but we’ll get on to that in a bit.

You should also consider writing a personal statement if you’re uploading your CV to a job board like CV-Library. This gives you the chance to highlight your career goals and give your CV more context.

While this is valuable information for recruiters, it’s just as important for you to get it right. Your personal statement will enable recruiters to match you with the right job and ensure that the role is fulfilling.

If you’re not entirely sure what job you want, or if there are a few sectors you reckon you could enter with your particular skill set, then it’s probably best not to include a personal statement.

If your opening statement is too broad, you risk giving the impression that you haven’t done your research properly. Or even that you’re looking for any old job. This isn’t the best impression to make on a potential employer!

How to structure a personal profile

We know writing a personal statement can seem quite daunting. But honestly, once you’ve started writing it, the rest will come naturally. Here’s a breakdown of the basics of creating your statement.

The most important thing to remember is that statements are usually around four sentences in length, and no more than six. Aim for anywhere between 50 and 200 words, and you’re golden.

Like the length, the grammatical person you’re writing in also has some flexibility. You could choose to write in the third person which can appear more objective, for example, ‘Project manager seeking… skills include…’ Or you could write in the first person which tends to be more personal: ‘I am a project manager seeking… My skills are…’

It honestly doesn’t matter which person you choose, just pick the one you’re comfortable writing in. As long as you keep it consistent, you can’t go wrong.

Does my personal profile need a title?

The simpler your CV layout, the better. The last thing recruiters want is to trawl through a bundle of words trying to pick out your good bits like they’re the orange ones in a packet of revels.

You don’t really need a title for your personal statement. It sits under your name and contact info and before the first chunk of your job or education history. So it’s pretty obvious it’s an introduction to you.

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  • Try more general keywords
  • Check your spelling
  • Replace abbreviations with the entire word

Secondly, make the spacing a little bigger and try increasing it to 1.5. As it’s the first thing a recruiter will read, you want this to be as clear as possible. It’s often a real decision maker.

What to include in your personal profile

When drafting your personal statement for your dream job in 2020, split it into three sections: who you are, what you can offer the company, and your career goals.

TIP: Bullet point things you might mention under each of these sections, then list the qualities that position you as the ideal person for the job.

Part 1

In the ‘who you are’ section you might state that you’re:

  • A recent graduate with a 2:1 degree in Creative Writing from the University of Surrey seeking an entry-level position in…
  • A highly-skilled mechanical engineer looking to resume a position in…
  • An ambitious purchasing manager looking to progress into…

Part 2

In the ‘what you can offer the company’ part, you’re selling your absolute top skills and strengths. You should also back them up with evidence. If you’re tweaking your CV for a particular job, use the job spec to create your statement. For example, if the employer is looking for someone with attention to detail and you’ve got experience meticulously proofing essays or presentations etc., then say so.

If you’re crafting a more general personal statement, be sure you include key achievements that make you stand out. For example, if you’re looking for a position within graphic design and you’ve got extensive Photoshop experience working on a major campaign, not only can you claim you have these skills in your personal statement, but you can back them up too – perfect!

The important thing to remember here is not to litter your personal statement with a trail of buzzwords. You might well be an ‘extremely driven strategic thinker with excellent communication skills and extensive experience in marketing’, but all you’ve really done here is told the recruiter that you’ve worked in marketing with no proof of your other claims.

To top it off, you’ve also revealed this information in an extremely boring way. Recruiters will have heard a million times before; when it comes to selling yourself, you don’t want to write something as bland and soggy as overcooked rice; you want to lovingly craft a seafood paella.

Try to highlight real, relevant skills and back them up with evidence to make the statement strong. Try something like this for the middle section:

  • During my degree, I have developed an excellent eye for detail, due to the heavy demands of assignments and research. As a result, I am also able to work under pressure. Especially when balancing my educational workload with my volunteering placement at local nursing homes
  • Knowledgeable engineer with a wide skill-set, including condition-based maintenance, through working on automated systems such as…
  • Through utilising my communications skills when working in managerial positions at large corporations, I have developed successful working relationships and resultantly, an advantageous professional network

Part 3

The final section of the personal statement is to highlight your career goals. More than anything this shows the recruiter that you’re a professional worth investing time and money in. Take a look at these examples:

  • I am looking for a challenging, fast-paced environment within media to utilise my written knowledge and develop my creative skill set further
  • Looking to re-establish a career in a progressive organisation which requires engineering expertise, after taking maternity leave to care for a new-born
  • I am looking to secure a challenging role in a market-leading automotive company where I can bring fresh strategic vision and value to the business

Dos and don’ts

Here’s a quick breakdown of the key points to remember when crafting that all-important statement.

  • Get straight to the point – recruiters don’t like to read waffle!
  • Provide evidence of your skills and experience, but be brief! Offer just enough to hook the recruiter
  • Remember that you’re marketing yourself
  • Make the statement look purposeful – you need show you know what you’re talking about, without sounding too arrogant
  • Reflect the job specification in your statement
  • Be real! Recruiters ultimately want to know you as a person and what you can bring to the table
  • Proofread for spelling and grammar
  • Read it aloud to make sure it flows properly. Probably best to get someone else to run an eye over it too
  • Overuse buzz words – You might want to chuck a few in there. But, a hyperbolic stream of empty qualities and meaningless words is just off-putting
  • Mix the grammatical person – remember either first person or third, not both
  • Be boring – you want to sound unique with noteworthy qualities
  • Copy from your cover letter or copy your cover letter from your statement – that’s just lazy
  • Ramble!

Complete personal profile examples for 2022

Here are a few final examples of personal statements for you to gloss over. Hopefully, it’ll spark some inspiration for your own.

‘I am a recent graduate with a 2:1 degree in Creative Writing from the University of Surrey seeking an entry-level position in copywriting. During my degree, I have developed an excellent eye for detail due to the heavy demands of assignments and research. Over the last year, I have also balanced an editing position at Surrey’s media society. Here, I devised content ideas and managed a small team of writers. This proves that I have potential to excel within a professional writing field. I am looking for a challenging, fast-paced environment within media to utilise my creative knowledge and develop my writing skill-set further.’

‘A highly-skilled mechanical engineer looking to resume a position in industrial construction. Extremely knowledgeable with seven years industry experience. Possesses a wide skill set, including condition-based maintenance, through working on automated systems on large-scale building projects. Looking to re-establish a career in a progressive organisation which requires engineering expertise after a short career break to take care of a new-born.’

‘I am an ambitious purchasing manager looking to progress into a senior purchasing position within the automotive sector. Having developed communication skills when working in managerial positions at large automotive corporations, I’ve nurtured successful working relationships. As a result, I possess an advantageous professional network. Due to over 12 years of experience within this industry, I am fully equipped with commercial awareness and product knowledge. My hopes are to secure a challenging role in a market-leading automotive company where I can bring fresh strategic vision and value to the business.’