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I not do my homework yet

8 Easy Ways to Finish Your Homework Faster

How many times have you found yourself still staring at your textbook around midnight (or later!) even when you started your homework hours earlier? Those lost hours could be explained by Parkinson’s Law, which states, “Work expands to fill the time available for its completion.” In other words, if you give yourself all night to memorize those geometry formulas for your quiz tomorrow, you’ll inevitably find that a 30 minute task has somehow filled your entire evening.

We know that you have more homework than ever. But even with lots and lots to do, a few tweaks to your study routine could help you spend less time getting more accomplished.

Here are 8 steps to make Parkinson’s Law work to your advantage:

1. Make a list

This should be a list of everything that has to be done that evening. And we mean, everything—from re-reading notes from this morning’s history class to quizzing yourself on Spanish vocabulary.

2. Estimate the time needed for each item on your list

You can be a little ruthless here. However long you think a task will take, try shaving off 5 or 10 minutes. But, be realistic. You won’t magically become a speed reader.

3. Gather all your gear

Collect EVERYTHING you will need for the homework you are working on (like your laptop for writing assignments and pencils for problem sets). Getting up for supplies takes you off course and makes it that much harder to get back to your homework.

4. Unplug

The constant blings and beeps from your devices can make it impossible to focus on what you are working on. Switch off or silence your phones and tablets, or leave them in another room until it’s time to take a tech break.

5. Time yourself

Noting how much time something actually takes will help you estimate better and plan your next study session.

6. Stay on task

If you’re fact checking online, it can be so easy to surf on over to a completely unrelated site. A better strategy is to note what information you need to find online, and do it all at once at the end of the study session.

7. Take plenty of breaks

Most of us need a break between subjects or to break up long stretches of studying. Active breaks are a great way to keep your energy up. Tech breaks can be an awesome way to combat the fear of missing out that might strike while you are buried in your work, but they also tend to stretch much longer than originally intended. Stick to a break schedule of 10 minutes or so.

8. Reward yourself!

Finish early? If you had allocated 30 minutes for reading a biology chapter and it only took 20, you can apply those extra 10 minutes to a short break—or just move on to your next task. If you stay on track, you might breeze through your work quickly enough to catch up on some Netflix.

Our best piece of advice? Keep at it. The more you use this system, the easier it will become. You’ll be surprised by how much time you can shave off homework just by focusing and committing to a distraction-free study plan.

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Did you do your homework yet?

Let’s suppose that I see my children watching TV at 6 pm. What is the question most people would ask?

Did you do your homework yet? or Have you done your homework yet?

Miss Julie
Senior Member
elenmacarado
New Member
Miss Julie
Senior Member
panjandrum
Lapsed Moderator

This could be another example of the AE/BE variation in the use of past/present perfect.

In this part of the world, the “Did you do your homework yet,” version would be very odd indeed.
Slightly less odd would be “Did you do your homework.” (Leaving out “yet”.)

The natural version is “Have you done your homework (yet)?”

the wired logics
Member

I’ve just found this piece of advice:

In informal English, Americans often use yet and already with simple past
to mean the same thing as present perfect meaning (that this action was
finished before now). This isn’t standard English, but you’ll hear Americans say it
when they’re talking informally.

Formal:
Have you eaten yet?
Yes, I’ve already eaten.
No, I haven’t eaten yet.

Informal:
Did you eat yet?
Yeah, I ate already.
No, I didn’t eat yet.

elenmacarado
New Member
vickyzyd
New Member

This could be another example of the AE/BE variation in the use of past/present perfect.

In this part of the world, the “Did you do your homework yet,” version would be very odd indeed.
Slightly less odd would be “Did you do your homework.” (Leaving out “yet”.)

The natural version is “Have you done your homework (yet)?”

the wired logics
Member

Sorry, I forgot to include the link.
Here it is:

I hope it makes sense to native speakers

mk_1855
Member

I have been taught British English and I agree, too.

The use of the Past Simple tense sounds a bit odd to me.

timpeac
Senior Member

I agree that the perfect version sounds much more natural to my (British) ears. After all, “yet” links to the present, and a past action linked to the present is one of the reasons the perfect tense is used.

Havfruen
Senior Member
Amber_1010
Senior Member

I was told by a British that, I cannot use ‘yet’ in ‘Did you do your homework yet.’ He says the sentence is incorrect because the yet implies present time, while the did implies past time.
​I think he was totally wrong, since obviously, American or Canadian speakers do use it.
The word ‘yet’ can mean either up to now OR up to time specified. (adopted from Collins dictionary)

But, what’s fun is that, when I checked the British dictionaries, Oxford and Cambridge.

They all said that yet meant up until now or something has not happened but we expect it to happen.
Only Collins, the American dictionary, has the meaning stated.

​But I’m sure I’m right. Yet means: up to the time specified or understood, not necessarily until the present.

Right?
Please comment. Especially AE speakers.
Thanks.

Copyright
Senior Member
Amber_1010
Senior Member
MarFish
Senior Member

As an AE speaker, “Did you do your homework yet?” sounds strange with “yet” included. “Have you done your homework yet?” sounds better and (I know) is grammatically correct. I have no preference saying either of these though, just whichever comes to my mind first.

My_name_is_Maria
New Member

I think my question can be considered a follow-up to this thread.

As a teacher, should I ask my pupils “Did you do your homework?” or “Have you done your homework?”

On the one hand, I am asking about the result: is it done or not? This is in favour of the perfect tense.

But on the other hand, in my mind there seems to be a reference to yesterday. Like in “Did you have a good flight?” and not “Have you had a good flight?” because we are thinking about some past moment even though we don’t specify it.

As well as similar questions: Did you bring your textbooks? / Have you brought your textbooks? What is a British teacher more likely to ask?

Thanks in advance.

london calling
Senior Member

Maria, a British teacher would ask ” Have you done your homework?”

“Did you do your homework?” would suggest that she is talking about a completed action in the past, even if s/he does not specify that (i.e. yesterday, on Sunday, etc. is not included in the question). That said, it would be an odd question: why would a teacher care if the homework was done ‘yesterday’ or ‘on Sunday’, as long as it has been done?

My_name_is_Maria
New Member

Thanks, that answers my question

Forero
Senior Member

Let’s suppose that I see my children watching TV at 6 pm. What is the question most people would ask?

Did you do your homework yet? or Have you done your homework yet?

I agree with Miss Julie on this one.

Though no family I know treats daily interactions within the family as formal occasions, I would not claim the use of simple past tense with “yet” unsuitable for formal occasions.

“Did you do your homework?” (without “yet”) suggests the speaker expected the children to have done their homework at some agreed upon or expected time (or by some agreed upon or expected time).

But with “yet”, it means (almost) the same as “Have you done your homework?”. In fact, it is this latter sentence that would seem a little awkward to me with a redundant “yet” added.

The question is really whether the children’s homework is complete, not whether it has been worked on, and “Did you do your homework yet?” is the best way to ask this.

There is still some “wiggle room”, however. Children who need to be asked tend to find ways to weasel out and answer ambiguously, so the less ambiguous the question, the better. I would be inclined to ask “Did you do all your homework yet?”.

Yes. For example, “yet” in “When your parents asked you last night whether you had done your homework yet, what did you say?” means effectively “before they asked the question”.