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He always helps me with my homework

How to Make Homework Less Work

Homework is your teachers’ way of evaluating how much you understand of what’s going on in class. But it can seem overwhelming at times. Luckily, you can do a few things to make homework less work.

Create a Homework Plan

Understand the assignment. Write it down in your notebook or planner, and don’t be afraid to ask questions about what’s expected. It’s much easier to take a minute to ask the teacher during or after class than to struggle to remember later that night.

If you have a lot of homework or activities, ask how long the particular homework assignment should take. That way you can budget your time.

Start right away. Just because it’s called “homework” doesn’t mean you have to do it at home. Use study periods or other extra time in your school day. The more you get done in school, the less you have to do at night.

Budget your time. If you don’t finish your homework at school, think about how much you have left and what else is going on that day. Most high-school students have between 1 and 3 hours of homework a night. If it’s a heavy homework day, you’ll need to devote more time to homework. It’s a good idea to come up with a homework schedule, especially if you’re involved in sports or activities or have an after-school job.

Watch Where You Work

When you settle down to do homework or to study, where do you do it? Parked in front of the TV? In the kitchen, with the sound of dishes being cleared and your brothers and sisters fighting?

Find a quiet place to focus. The kitchen table was OK when you were younger and homework didn’t require as much concentration. But now you’ll do best if you can find a place to get away from noise and distractions, like a bedroom or study.

Avoid studying on your bed. Sit at a desk or table that you can set your computer on and is comfortable to work at. Park your devices while you study. Just having your phone where you can see it can be a distraction. That makes homework take longer.

Get to Work

Tackle the hardest assignments first. It’s tempting to start with the easy stuff to get it out of the way. But you have the most energy and focus when you begin. Use this mental power on the subjects that are most challenging. Later, when you’re more tired, you can focus on the simpler things.

Keep moving ahead. If you get stuck, try to figure out the problem as best you can — but don’t spend too much time on it because this can mess up your homework schedule for the rest of the night. If you need to, ask an adult or older sibling for help. Or reach out to a classmate. Just don’t pick someone you’ll be up all night chatting with or you’ll never get it done!

Take breaks. Most people have short attention spans. Sitting for too long without stretching or relaxing will make you less productive than if you stop every so often. Taking a 15-minute break every hour is a good idea for most people. (If you’re really concentrating, wait until it’s a good time to stop.)

Get It Ready to Go

When your homework is done, put it in your backpack. There’s nothing worse than having a completed assignment that you can’t find the next morning. Now you’re free to hang out — without the guilt of unfinished work hanging over you.

Get Help When You Need It

Even when you pay attention in class, study for tests, and do your homework, some subjects seem too hard. You may hope that things will get easier, but most of the time that doesn’t happen.

What does happen for many people is that they work harder and harder as they fall further and further behind. There’s nothing embarrassing about asking for help. No one understands everything.

Start with your teacher or guidance counselor. Some teachers will work with students before or after school to explain things more clearly. But what if you don’t feel comfortable with your teacher? If your school is big, there may be other teachers who know the same subject. Sometimes it just helps to have someone new explain something in a different way.

Ask a classmate. If you know someone who is good at a subject, ask if you can study together. This may help, but keep in mind that people who understand a subject aren’t always good at explaining it.

Find a tutor. You’ll need to talk to an adult about this because it usually costs money to hire a tutor. Tutors come to your home or meet you someplace like the library or a tutoring center. They work with students to review and explain things taught in the classroom. This gives you the chance to ask questions and work at your own pace. Your teacher or guidance counselor can help you find a tutor if you’re interested.

Help me my homework

I’m curious if there is subtle difference among root infinitive, to + infinitive and -ing after a phrase with a construction “help + objective”.

Because I learned those things are a okay in that case. But my teacher didn’t teach me how difference there is among them.

So would you mind if i ask you difference among them?

Florentia52
Modwoman in the attic

Please give us an example sentence that illustrates your question, along with the context in which you would use it.

mink-shin
Senior Member

Please give us an example sentence that illustrates your question, along with the context in which you would use it.

i) Help me do my homework.
ii) Help me doing my homework.
iii) Help me to do my homework.

I made 3 sentences. thanks.

Florentia52
Modwoman in the attic
mink-shin
Senior Member

I think three sentences are correct because i’ve learned 3 things are right.

I think number ii is meaning that I’m asking help, doing my job. I have no idea with number i and iii.

Florentia52
Modwoman in the attic

“Help me do” and “help me to do” are both correct and mean the same thing. Because the “to” is unnecessary, most people would omit it.

“Help me doing my homework” is not correct.

johngiovanni
Senior Member

I agree with Florentia, of course, but just to say “Help me with my homework, please” is also good.
We could make up other sentences where the -ing form is appropriate. “I would like some help with doing the ironing”; “Could you please help me with tidying up the kitchen”, etc.

mink-shin
Senior Member

“Help me do” and “help me to do” are both correct and mean the same thing. Because the “to” is unnecessary, most people would omit it.
Thanks, Florentia52.
“Help me doing my homework” is not correct.

My teacher taught me that i could omit a phrase with construction “which+be”.
Is there any problem when i think of the sentence “Help me doing my homework” as the sentence without “which am”?
‘Help me doing my homework = Help me which am doing my homework.’
Would you mind if i ask you that equal is right?

I agree with Florentia, of course, but just to say “Help me with my homework, please” is also good.
We could make up other sentences where the -ing form is appropriate. “I would like some help with doing the ironing”; “Could you please help me with tidying up the kitchen”, etc.

Florentia52
Modwoman in the attic

My teacher taught me that i could omit a phrase with construction “which+be”.
Is there any problem when i think of the sentence “Help me doing my homework” as the sentence without “which am”?

I’m sorry, but I don’t understand your question. How would “which am” fit into a version of the sentence “Help me doing my homework?” (To be honest, it’s hard to think of any sentence in which “which am” could be used.)

mink-shin
Senior Member

I’m sorry, but I don’t understand your question. How would “which am” fit into a version of the sentence “Help me doing my homework?” (To be honest, I can’t think of any sentence in which “which am” could be used.)

Forero
Senior Member

“Help me doing my homework” does not work.

“I need some help doing my homework” would be fine (but that is with the noun help, not the verb).

mink-shin
Senior Member

“Help me doing my homework” does not work.

“I need some help doing my homework” would be fine (but that is with the noun help, not the verb).

velisarius
Senior Member

The verb “help” is followed by an infinitive: She helped me (to) do my homework.

It may be followed by the -ing form in negative sentences of this type, where the meaning of “help” is different:

I couldn’t help noticing that her fingernails were dirty.

sagar grammar
Senior Member

Even I was taught and I have also read it in a grammar book which says.

The verb “help” can be followed by an infinitive , “bare infinitive” and also a “preposition+ gerund”.
With no grammatical mistake.
Means.
1- he helped me to do my h.w. (√)
2- he helped me do my h.w. (√)
3- he helped me doing my h.w. (×)
4- he helped me in doing my h.w. (√)

Sentence 3 is wrong..
But 4 is correct.
While 2 is more usual than 1

Hope this will help you

velisarius
Senior Member

I don’t think I would use your (3).

He helped me by doing my homework is possible, but the meaning changes. Here, he does all the work for me.

sagar grammar
Senior Member

That’s what i said.

I don’t think I would use your (3).

He helped me by doing my homework is possible, but the meaning changes. Here, he does all the work for me.

If we want to use the gerund after the verb “help” We have to use a preposition before that gerund..
It will keep our sentence grammatically correct though the meaning changes.

As in
1- he helped me in doing my work ( means i was doing my work he just helped me )
2- he helped me by doing my work ( means he helped me and did all my work on his own.)
3- he helped me after doing my work. ( he did my work and then helped me in sth)
4- he helped me before doing my work. (He helped me in sth and then he did my work )

My point is that
Help + a person + gerund (×)
Help + a person + “preposition + gerund” (√)

Hope this will help .

velisarius
Senior Member

I’m sorry, sagar grammmar – I meant to write “I don’t think I would use your #4 either”.

I’ll help you in doing the washing-up.
I’ll help you (to) do the washing -up.

sagar grammar
Senior Member

I’m sorry, sagar grammmar – I meant to write “I don’t think I would use your #4 either”.

I’ll help you in doing the washing-up.
I’ll help you (to) do the washing -up.

In my opinion both are correct..
As i have read.

See this picture .
This is from a grammar book the rule is written in the hindi language but it has a sentence using the verb “help”

The book is saying..
– He helped me solved the problem. ( wrong)
We can use “solve”, “to solve” or “in solving” in place of “solved” in the sentence to make it correct..

Attachments
velisarius
Senior Member

I certainly wouldn’t recommend anyone to use “help someone in doing something”, since we normally simply use the infinitive. You can compare here frequency of usage:

mink-shin
Senior Member

sagar, thanks very much.

After careful reading your post, I’m totally understand now.

All your example helped me to study about the verb “help”.

Especially, your example about difference of prepositions is most.

And velisarius, Thanks.

mink-shin
Senior Member

I’m sorry, sagar grammmar – I meant to write “I don’t think I would use your #4 either”.

i) I’ll help you in doing the washing-up.
ii) I’ll help you (to) do the washing -up.

Assuming those sentences’re all correct, do you think that there is any difference of meaning between those sentences?

velisarius
Senior Member

I’m not assuming anything, but in this example:
“A Pilot engaged for airspray work had to supervise the work of persons who helped him in doing the work he himself had to perform.”

I see no difference in meaning. The example is from Law on Industrial Disputes, by Vithalbhai B. Patel
Commentary on sections 1 to 40

I have no way of knowing whether Vithalbhai Patel was educated in India, but perhaps the construction is more common in Indian English. Most (not all) of the examples I could find online were by non-native writers.

Edit: this particular example sounds almost okay to me, but I find it a little ambiguous: does he mean “helped him to do the work” or helped him by doing the work”?

mink-shin
Senior Member

I’m not assuming anything, but in this example:
“A Pilot engaged for airspray work had to supervise the work of persons who helped him in doing the work he himself had to perform.”

I see no difference in meaning. The example is from Law on Industrial Disputes, by Vithalbhai B. Patel
Commentary on sections 1 to 40

I have no way of knowing whether Vithalbhai Patel was educated in India, but perhaps the construction is more common in Indian English. Most (not all) of the examples I could find online were by non-native writers.

It sounds better like “helped him to do the work” than “to me.

I asked you to assume it for same reason. I found no difference between them.

sagar grammar
Senior Member

Even I was taught and I have also read it in a grammar book which says.

The verb “help” can be followed by an infinitive , “bare infinitive” and also a “preposition+ gerund”.
With no grammatical mistake.
Means.
1- he helped me to do my h.w. (√)
2- he helped me do my h.w. (√)
3- he helped me doing my h.w. (×)
4- he helped me in doing my h.w. (√)

Sentence 3 is wrong..
But 4 is correct.
While 2 is more usual than 1

Hope this will help you

The sentences in post no. 14.
1,2 and 4
.all these are fine and can be used without any change in meaning.

mink-shin
Senior Member

Oh yeah, good. Thanks.

All of you who wrote any post in this thread. Thanks a lot.

Barque
Banned
sagar grammar
Senior Member

And in my opinion ..
These both are correct but have different meaning..

1- He helped me in doing the work.(i was doing my work and he helped me in that )
2- He helped me by doing the work. ( i wasn’t doing the work he helped me and did all my work himself )

That’s what i think..
being a non native speaker i can only tell you my thinking and how i have seen it’s usage.
It’s your choice believe it or not..

mink-shin
Senior Member

And in my opinion ..
These both are correct but have different meaning..

1- He helped me in doing the work.(i was doing my work and he helped me in that )
2- He helped me by doing the work. ( i wasn’t doing the work he helped me and did all my work himself )

That’s what i think..
being a non native speaker i can only tell you my thinking and how i have seen it’s usage.
It’s your choice believe it or not..

Sagar, you’re one of best teacher i’ve ever met. Thanks !
There are a lot of people who use English, I think that’s why this forum exist.s
So I don’t care if you’re native or not.

sagar grammar
Senior Member

Sagar, you’re one of best teacher i’ve ever met. Thanks !
There are a lot of people who use English, I think that’s why this forum exist.

It is nice to be helpful .

sagar grammar
Senior Member

Sagar, you’re one of best teacher i’ve ever met. Thanks !
There are a lot of people who use English, I think that’s why this forum exist.
So I don’t care if you’re native or not.

Sagar, you’re one of best teacher i’ve ever met. Thanks !
There are a lot of people who use English, I think that’s why this forum exist.
So I don’t care if you’re native or not.

Sagar, you’re one of best teacher i’ve ever met. Thanks !
There are a lot of people who use English, I think that’s why this forum exist.
So I don’t care if you’re native or not.

There are some mistakes in your post ..
The sentence should be written as..
“You’re one of the best teachers I’ve ever met. “

mink-shin
Senior Member

There are some mistakes in your post ..
The sentence should be written as..
“You’re one of the best teachers I’ve ever met. “

Forero
Senior Member

“They helped him in doing the work” does not always mean the same as “They helped him do the work”. The latter means they did part of the work; the former could mean they did all or part of the work, or that they did something else while he did the work.

The sentence about the pilot sounds odd to me overall, but the part “helped him in doing the work he himself had to perform” is a little weak/wordy but acceptable with the meaning “by doing work” = “by doing some work”.

velisarius
Senior Member

I don’t think “They helped him in doing the work” can mean “they did something else while he did the work”, but I agree that the version with preposition “in” may be ambiguous.

I think it’s rare to find an example of “help in doing” in current usage, but here’s Conan-Doyle (Study in Scarlet):

“Now the skillful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work. ”
Annotated A Study in Scarlet with English Grammar Exercises

mink-shin
Senior Member

I don’t think “They helped him in doing the work” can mean “they did something else while he did the work”, but I agree that the version with preposition “in” may be ambiguous.

I agree with you.

Before reading some examples, it’d been weird for me to understand the version with preposition “in”.
But after reading them, I think that those versions are same meaning.

“I felt that he was inquiring and looking for something to help him in deciding my length of stay.” (A Good Pair of Boots and A Road to Walk On – C. H. Evers)

Forero
Senior Member

I agree with you.

Before reading some examples, it’d been weird for me to understand the version with preposition “in”.
But after reading them, I think that those versions are same meaning.

“I felt that he was inquiring and looking for something to help him in deciding my length of stay.” (A Good Pair of Boots and A Road to Walk On – C. H. Evers)

mink-shin
Senior Member
velisarius
Senior Member

“I felt that he was inquiring and looking for something to help him in deciding my length of stay.” (A Good Pair of Boots and A Road to Walk On – C. H. Evers)

It’s interesting, as the writer has used the same construction at least three times in the book.

On page 79 – “I went to the credit bureau and told them my problem: they were not at all concerned and they refused to help in correcting it.” (Refused to help correct it.)

On page 198 – “She told me to keep track of every blank call [. ] by marking it on a calendar, as this would help them in searching their own records.” (This would help them when searching their own records – not equivalent to “this would help them to search their own records”)

sagar grammar
Senior Member

“I felt that he was inquiring and looking for something to help him in deciding my length of stay.” (A Good Pair of Boots and A Road to Walk On – C. H. Evers)

It’s interesting, as the writer has used the same construction at least three times in the book.

On page 79 – “I went to the credit bureau and told them my problem: they were not at all concerned and they refused to help in correcting it.” (Refused to help correct it.)

On page 198 – “She told me to keep track of every blank call [. ] by marking it on a calendar, as this would help them in searching their own records.” (This would help them when searching their own records – not equivalent to “this would help them to search their own records”)

The refused to help in correcting it .
Can’t be written as
They refused to help correct it.

While This can be exist in my opinion
They refused to help us in correcting this. (√)
They refused to help us correct this (√)

The use of gerund, infinitive, and bare infinitive is applicable when there is an object after the verb “help”

And there is no example come to my mind where we use two successive first form of verbs..do you have any ?

Tell me if I m wrong !!

mink-shin
Senior Member

“I felt that he was inquiring and looking for something to help him in deciding my length of stay.” (A Good Pair of Boots and A Road to Walk On – C. H. Evers)

It’s interesting, as the writer has used the same construction at least three times in the book.

On page 79 – “I went to the credit bureau and told them my problem: they were not at all concerned and they refused to help in correcting it.” (Refused to help correct it.)

On page 198 – “She told me to keep track of every blank call [. ] by marking it on a calendar, as this would help them in searching their own records.” (This would help them when searching their own records – not equivalent to “this would help them to search their own records”)

Since the gift’s purpose is to help you in being able to give up the weight, [. ] (Marion Bilich Weight Loss From the Inside Out: Help for the Compulsive Eater) (‘Purpose is to help you when you’re being able to give up the weight.’ and ‘Purpose is to help you to give up the weight’, I think it could mean either one or both.)

Now I think a phrase including construction ‘in + an infinitive + -ing’ after the verb “help” might be interpreted as ‘when + the infinitive + -ing‘(from now on, I’ll call this A case.) rather than ‘to + the infinitive’(from now on, I’ll call this B case).

Because I think A case could include B case.

I think C.H Ever’s that bold phrase of the sentence on page 79 is exception. I think “in” in that case is a preposition indicating how to help.