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English language paper 1 creative writing

English Language Paper 1: section B CREATIVE WRITING

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Hey guys, I’m in year 9 and we are doing Creative Writing (aka Language Paper 1: Section B) for my end of year exams. I am wondering if anybody could give me some advice on how to get the best marks?

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Have a cyclical structure, so maybe start and end with something similar to have that link and flow in your writing. Include a one line paragraph somewhere, stick to one tense, include a small change that occurs which will act like a small plot twist. Try not to start with the or it, start with a verb or a noun.

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Thank you so much, that is really helpful. I was also wondering what vocabulary and techniques are quite impressive and can help you stand out from other people.

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Number one priority is make sure the story makes sense with a clear start middle and end.
Good punctuation including colons and semi-colons gets you good marks.
e.g: item one, item two, item three: statement about the list. This gets you marks for lists, sentence length and punctuation.
for example, Ominous, dark, full of silence: the forest was not a place I wanted to be at night.
Or you can use semi-colons in a list e.g: he was tall; he was dark; he was handsome.
Building your vocabulary in year 9 is a really good idea as it makes you stand out in your year 11 exams. Do research by checking the thesaurus for alternative words but make sure you understand them and you are using them correctly.
Single word sentences are good to set tone in between longer sentences.
Make sure your story is compelling, abstract if you can do it confidently and progresses through a scene. But don’t set it over a long time period. Also being very descriptive and writing a lot about a little thing in a scene is effective. If you can write a paragraph describing a single object and giving it significance in your story that will get you into the higher grades.
Start your sentences with different types of words (adverbs, nouns, pronouns, adjective etc)
Hope this helps : D

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Thank you so much, that’s super helpful! That’s what I thought as well, if I start working on it by Year 9, in Year 11 it might be easier to achieve the grades I’m aiming for. Thank you again!

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Contrary to popular opinion on here, there is not a list of techniques that examiners are looking for. Nothing makes us cringe more than marking a paper where it’s clear that the candidate is trying to cram in as many techniques as possible. I’ve never yet marked a paper up for use of a semicolon although I have marked one down for inappropriate use of one. The lesson there is to avoid them if you don’t know how to use them and to do what’s best for the writing.
The best papers I’ve seen are the ones that stick to the brief I.e. don’t write a preprepared piece of writing – they stick out a mile off and it’s the single most likely thing to cost you marks. From there it’s the people who use comparative devices sparingly who do better than those who try to cram in as many as they can in the available space and time. People who are creative with the mundane tend to do well too. I marked one paper a few years ago that stuck out because of the way she/he did a story about a character searching for her sister who’d got lost as an opportunity to reflect on the relationship between the sisters. What could have been a really frantic search story turned into something genuinely moving and interesting. The story was about three events in total but those events were used as a scaffold to tell a much more complete story about two sisters.

For descriptive pieces, the worst offence is to turn them into first or third person narratives. You’ve generally capped your mark when you make that choice. You’ve usually been given a picture to describe or to inspire you. Finding a “narrative” within the picture to hang your description on is a better move e.g. tracing the pattern of light through a scene, moving from left to right, using the single animate object in the scene to help you trace a path through the picture. And even in descriptive scenes, make sure you’re actually quite sparing with your descriptive devices. And make sure that they’re tonally appropriate. I read something a few years ago when marking where a candidate wrote that the trees surrounded a house like bullies. It was a great simile. Completely wrong for the description he was writing, though, which was far more positive and it ended up not working and ruining the piece. Judicious use of devices and techniques are rewarded highly. Just jamming and stabbing them in like the spear-like sticks in the fraught childhood pastime of Ker Plunk is merely acknowledged.

Lesson on creative writing – English Language paper 1 question 5

Engaging English. Secondary level. From Stormzy lyrics to Tony Walsh’s ‘This is the Place’ poetry analysis, it’s engaging.

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1-2 lessons on introduction to creative writing for language paper 1 q5. Using the senses and ambitious vocab. Video links and activities included.

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Engaging English. Secondary level. From Stormzy lyrics to Tony Walsh’s ‘This is the Place’ poetry analysis, it’s engaging.

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