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English creative writing nyu

The English Department’s New Creative Writing Track (by Cynthia De Luna)

NYU’s English Department has churned out numerous talented writers over the years. This year, however, the program has taken up a new commitment to integrating students’ specifically creative interests into the current English major through its new Creative Writing Track. While students have often turned to the Creative Writing minor outside the English Department to develop their creative talents, current English students can now also foster those talents through the English Department’s offerings.

Professor McLane’s section of Reading As A Writer on a visit to the La Monte Young and Marian Zazeela Dream House

The Creative Writing Track within the English Department extends the now-named Literary Studies Track in a way that allows students to approach literature and writing from a new perspective, one that asks them to consider the relationship between critical and analytical thinking and creative practices. Like the Literary Studies Track, the Creative Writing Track requires the four core courses (Introduction to the Study of Literature, formerly called Literary Interpretation, British Literature I, British Literature II, and American Literature I). The Creative Writing Track also requires a fifth course alongside these four, the Reading as a Writer course, which debuted this semester in two sections: Faculty Coordinator Professor Nicholas Boggs’ “Queer Literature” and Professor Maureen McLane’s “Poetry, Hybrid Genre, Creative Encounter.” Reading as a Writer acts as a gateway course in which students approach reading with an emphasis on questions of craft, and it will be offered once again next year.

Marcel Broodthaers, “Parle Ecrit Copie” (1972–73)

The Creative Writing Track gives students the choice to take either a pre-1800s course or a critical theories course rather than both, and the track requires students to take two creative writing workshops through the Creative Writing Department, an introductory workshop and a second workshop. (Courses taken towards the Creative Writing minor can count for the Track as well.) While the Literary Studies Track allows students three English electives, the Creative Writing Track requires two; the third elective is replaced by a workshop-based colloquium that students take while they work on an independent capstone writing project. “[The] Creative Writing Track colloquium, much like the honors colloquium, provides students with a rigorous and community-building context in which to develop their capstone projects,” Professor Boggs explains. The capstone project is ultimately a culmination of students’ work in the track, and can take various forms—a collection of poems, a novella, or a play, for example—depending on what students decide on with the help of a faculty adviser. Each student will work with a faculty adviser over the course of the semester, and interested students are encouraged to approach possible advisers as soon as their ideas have begun to develop; members of the faculty who are active creative writers include Professors Boggs and McLane as well as Professors Julia Jarcho, Tomas Urayoán Noel, and Lytle Shaw. “We are especially pleased,” adds Professor Boggs, “that Jess Row, a notable fiction writer who was just awarded a Guggenheim, will be joining us for the 2016-2017 academic year, during which he will teach a section of Reading as a Writer and serve as adviser for a number of capstone projects.”

The return of a creative writing track within NYU’s English Department offers current and prospective English students a chance to take on literary studies in a way that allows them to use and hone their critical, analytical, and creative skills concurrently. It will provide students with a new way of looking at texts, one that pushes the English program further and challenges students to take on literature with a different set of skills.

English (2020 – 2022)

Offered every term. Required for all English majors: ENGL-UA 101, and three out of the following four courses: ENGL-UA 111, 112, 113, 114. Majors in the creative writing track must also take ENGL-UA 201 in addition to those four courses. Required for English minors: ENGL-UA 101 and one course chosen from ENGL-UA 111, 112, 113 or 114.

Introduction to the Study of Literature
ENGL-UA 101 Formerly Literary Interpretation (ENGL-UA 200). Prerequisite: completion of the College’s expository writing requirement. Restricted to declared and intended English majors and minors. 4 points.
Gateway course to the major that introduces students to the demands and pleasures of university-level investigation of English literature. Develops the tools necessary for advanced criticism: close-reading skills, knowledge of generic conventions, mastery of critical terminology, and skill at a variety of modes of analysis, from the formal to the historical. Also emphasizes frequent writing.

Literatures in English I: Medieval and Early Modern Literatures
ENGL-UA 111 Formerly British Literature I (ENGL-UA 210). Prerequisite (or corequisite with permission of the department and/or instructor): Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101) or equivalent approved by the course instructor. 4 points.
Survey of English literature from its origins in the Anglo-Saxon epic through Milton. Close reading of representative works, with attention to the historical, intellectual, and social contexts of the period.

Literatures in English II: Literatures of the British Isles and British Empire, 1660-1900
ENGL-UA 112 Formerly British Literature II (ENGL-UA 220). Prerequisite (or corequisite with permission of the department and/or instructor): Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101) or equivalent approved by the course instructor. 4 points.
Survey of literature in English from the British Isles and British Empire, from the Restoration through 1900. Close reading of representative works with attention to the historical, intellectual, and social contexts of the period.

Literatures in English III: American Literatures to 1900
ENGL-UA 113 Formerly American Literature I (ENGL-UA 230). Prerequisite (or corequisite with permission of the department and/or instructor): Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101) or equivalent approved by the course instructor. 4 points.
Surveys the evolution of literary themes and forms from the period of European exploration through and beyond the Civil War, tracing distinctive traditions of writing and thinking that have shaped the development of modern literature and thought in the United States.

Literatures in English IV: Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Literatures
ENGL-UA 114 Prerequisite (or corequisite with permission of the department and/or instructor): Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101) or equivalent approved by the course instructor. 4 points.
An overview of English-language literary production as it expands and diversifies from 1900 onward. Topics: international modernisms; literatures of imperialism, anti-colonialism, and diaspora; race, ethnicity, and representation; and the significance of English-language writing in an increasingly globalized cultural field.

Reading as a Writer
ENGL-UA 201 Prerequisite (or corequisite with permission of the department and/or instructor): Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101) or equivalent approved by the course instructor. 4 points.
Creative and critical reading and writing as reciprocal activities. Theories and criticism of literature. Close attention to genre, style, and mode. Focus may vary by instructor.

Courses in Literature for Majors and Minors (Open to All Undergraduates)

The following courses are open to all undergraduates who have fulfilled the College’s expository writing requirement.

Theory of Drama
ENGL-UA 130 Identical to DRLIT-UA 130. Offered every year. 4 points.
Theories of meaning and theories of performance. Theories of meaning include semiotics, deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalysis, new historicism, and postmodernism. Theories of practice include naturalism, Dadaism, futurism, epic theatre, theatre of cruelty, poor theatre, and environmental theatre. Theories are examined through theoretical essays and representative plays.

Drama in Performance in New York
ENGL-UA 132 Identical to DRLIT-UA 300. Offered every year. 4 points.
Combines the study of drama as literary text with the study of theatre as its three-dimensional translation, both theoretically and practically. Drawing on the rich theatrical resources of New York City, students see approximately twelve plays, covering classical to contemporary and traditional to experimental theatre. Readings include plays and essays in theory and criticism.

Dante and His World

ENGL-UA 143 Identical to MEDI-UA 801, ITAL-UA 160. 4 points.
See description in the medieval and Renaissance studies section of this Bulletin.

Film as Literature
ENGL-UA 170 Identical to DRLIT-UA 501. Offered every year. 4 points.
The development of the film as a major art form and its relationship to other art forms. Particular attention to the language of cinema, the director and screenwriter as authors, and the problems of translating literature into film, with extensive discussion of the potentials and limitations of each art form. Milestone films are viewed and analyzed.

Writing New York
ENGL-UA 180 Offered periodically. 4 points.
An introduction to the cultural history of New York through an exploration of fiction, poetry, plays, and films about the city, from Washington Irving to the present. Social and cultural backgrounds and issues.

American Short Story
ENGL-UA 240 Offered periodically. 4 points.
Study of theme and technique in the American short story. Content will vary from semester to semester. Please consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

Shakespeare
ENGL-UA 410 Identical to DRLIT-UA 225. Offered every year. 4 points.
A survey of Shakespeare’s major plays and poems, with attention to their historical, cultural, and theatrical contexts.

English Renaissance Drama
ENGL-UA 420 Formerly English Drama to 1642. Offered periodically. 4 points.
Reading of major non-Shakespearean drama, including plays by Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, and others, with attention to both formal and historical questions. Issues of genre, gender and sexuality, status, degree, and nation.

17th-Century English Literature
ENGL-UA 440 Identical to MEDI-UA 440. Offered periodically. 4 points.
Introduction to the prose and poetry of the 17th century, an age of spiritual, scientific, and political crisis. Readings in Jonson, Donne, Bacon, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Browne, and others.

19th-Century British Novel
ENGL-UA 530 Formerly English Novel in the 19th Century. Offered every year. 4 points.
Studies in the forms and contexts of the 19th-century British novel.

20th-Century British Novel
ENGL-UA 605 Formerly British Novel in the 20th Century. Offered periodically. 4 points.
Studies in the forms and contexts of the 20th-century British novel.

20th-Century British and Anglophone Literature
ENGL-UA 606 Offered periodically. 4 points.
Poetry, fiction, and drama since World War I. Selected major texts by modernist, postcolonial, and postmodern writers.

American Fiction, 1900-1945
ENGL-UA 635 Formerly American Fiction Before World War II. Offered periodically. 4 points.
Literary movements and social contexts in a period of remarkable innovation. Focus on realism, naturalism, modernism, and contemporary eclectic style. Novels by Theodore Dreiser, John Dos Passos, Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Saul Bellow, and Ralph Ellison, as well as short fiction and critical and cultural essays.

Post-1945 American Fiction
ENGL-UA 640 Formerly American Fiction Since World War II. Offered periodically. 4 points.
Particular focus on the literary art and cultural meanings forged in a period of creative innovation and troubling uncertainty. Readings likely to include works by John Updike, E.L .Doctorow, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, Flannery O’Connor, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Tim O’Brien, Louise Erdrich, Phil Klay, Art Spiegelman, Amy Tan, Jonathan Lethem, and Junot Diaz.

Literature and the Environment
ENGL-UA 675 Identical to ANST-UA 475 and ENVST-UA 675. Topics determine prerequisites. 4 points.
Topics vary.

Asian American Literature

ENGL-UA 716 Formerly SCA-UA 301. Identical to SCA-UA 306, COLIT-UA 301. Offered every year. 4 points.
See description in the Asian/Pacific/American studies section of this Bulletin.

Tragedy
ENGL-UA 720 Identical to COLIT-UA 110, DRLIT-UA 200. 4 points.
See description in the comparative literature section of this Bulletin.

Science Fiction
ENGL-UA 728 Offered periodically. 4 points.
Contemporary science fiction as literature, social commentary, prophecy, and a reflection of recent and possible future trends in technology and society. Writers include Asimov, Ballard, Butler, Clarke, Delany, Dick, Gibson, Heinlein, Herbert, Le Guin, Stephenson, and Sterling.

Queer Literature
ENGL-UA 749 Identical to SCA-UA 482. 4 points.
Study of notions of queerness and its relation to mainstream culture through detailed exploration of literary texts and other cultural productions in a variety of genres. Historical period and national focus (e.g., British, American, Commonwealth) may vary; please consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

Topics in Irish Literature
ENGL-UA 761 Identical to IRISH-UA 761. 4 points.
See description in the Irish studies section of this Bulletin.

Advanced Courses in Literature

The following courses have departmental prerequisites (as noted below). Qualified nonmajors may enroll with the permission of the instructor.

18th- and 19th-Century African American Literature
ENGL-UA 250 Identical to SCA-UA 783. Prerequisite: African American Literary Cultures (ENGL-UA 185) or Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Survey of major autobiographies, fiction, and poetry from the early national period to the eve of the New Negro Renaissance. Writers include Equiano, Wheatley, Jacobs, Brown, Douglass, Harper, and Wilson.

20th-Century African American Literature
ENGL-UA 251 Identical to SCA-UA 784. Prerequisite: African American Literary Cultures (ENGL-UA 185) or Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Major fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama from Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk (1903) to works by Toni Morrison and Claudia Rankine. Discussion of the Harlem Renaissance and its key figures, including Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston. Other writers may include Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, and Jayne Cortez.

Contemporary Black Literature
ENGL-UA 254 Formerly Contemporary African American Fiction. Identical to SCA-UA 786. Prerequisite: African American Literary Cultures (ENGL-UA 185) or Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Study of the development of black literary expression and critical thought in late 20th- and early 21st-century writing.

Medieval Literature in Translation
ENGL-UA 310 Identical to MEDI-UA 310. Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Introduction to the culture and literature of the medieval world through translations of diverse texts written in Latin, French, German, Italian, Icelandic, and other vernacular languages. Texts are selected according to the theme or focus chosen by the instructor.

Medieval Romance
ENGL-UA 311 Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Study of how these tales of adventure, love, and magic both construct and deconstruct ideals of selfhood, masculinity, femininity, heterosexuality, nationality, geography, temporality, religion, spirituality, nature, and the function and performance of linguistic discourse. Consideration of other genres (saints’ lives, chronicles, travel writing, allegory, and exempla). Readings in Middle English and in translation.

Introduction to Old English Language and Literature
ENGL-UA 315 Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111). Offered periodically. 4 points.
The grammar and vocabulary of this earliest surviving form of English. Topics: the heroic code; conversion and cultural syncretism; the rise of English national identity; monasticism and spirituality; the law and customs of the Anglo-Saxons; the Viking invasions and the Norman Conquest; and hybridity and multilingualism. Concludes with reading excerpts from Beowulf in the original and performing scenes from the poem.

Chaucer
ENGL-UA 320 Identical to MEDI-UA 320. Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Major poetry, with particular attention to The Canterbury Tales. General language training is provided. Special attention to Chaucer’s narrative skill, techniques of characterization, style, varieties of formal invention, and particular thematic preoccupations. Chaucer’s writing as a lens onto late medieval society and culture.

Early Modern Literature
ENGL-UA 445 Identical to MEDI-UA 445. Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Topic varies each term. Consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

Milton
ENGL-UA 450 Identical to MEDI-UA 450. Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Emphasis on the major poems (Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes) with some attention to the early poems and the prose. Traces the poet’s sense of vocation, analyzes the gradual development of the Miltonic style, and assesses Milton’s position in the history of English literature, politics, and theology.

Restoration and Early 18th-Century Literature
ENGL-UA 500 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
In 1660, the theatres reopened after nearly two decades of Puritan rule and prohibition, and the publishing trades boomed as never before. Topics: the birth of the novel and journalism; continuity and transformation of epic poetry, drama, the essay, and satire; and the emergence of professional women writers. Authors include John Dryden, Joseph Addison and Richard Steele, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Daniel Defoe, and Eliza Haywood.

Mid- and Late 18th-Century British Literature
ENGL-UA 501 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Explores a range of genres (the novel, journalism, drama, poetry, satire, essays, travel writing, and biography) in various contexts: the growth of London and other cities; colonies gained and lost; new scientific theories and discoveries; and Enlightenment challenges to authority. Authors include Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Gray, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Ann Radcliffe, Francis Burney, and Jane Austen.

Restoration and 18th-Century Drama
ENGL-UA 505 Identical to DRLIT-UA 235. Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111) or History of Drama and Theatre I (ENGL-UA 125). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Urban comedies and classical tragedies, closet dramas and box-office successes, propaganda pieces and broad satires, puritan reform and libertine excess. Playwrights may include John Dryden, Margaret Cavendish, George Etherege, William Wycherley, Aphra Behn, John Milton, Thomas Otway, Joseph Addison, John Gay, and Henry Fielding.

The 18th-Century British Writer
ENGL-UA 515 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Topic varies by term. Consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

Major Victorian Writers
ENGL-UA 525 Formerly Major British Writers: 1832-1870. Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Writers may include Thomas Carlyle, Emily Brontë, Lord Alfred Tennyson, Walter Pater, Charles Darwin, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Charles Dickens, Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin, Christina Rossetti, and Algernon Charles Swinburne.

British Literature of Transition
ENGL-UA 540 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Study of late Victorian and early modern literature and a reassessment of the notions of transition and modernity. Writers to be studied may include Thomas Hardy, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, Lytton Strachey, and T.S. Eliot.

Topics in 19th-Century Literature
ENGL-UA 545 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Topic varies each term. Consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

19th-Century American Poetry
ENGL-UA 550 Prerequisite: Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
A survey of 19th-century American verse. Considers both popular (that is, forgotten) and acknowledged major poets of the period, with an eye toward discerning the conventions that bind them to and separate them from one another.

19th-Century American Writers
ENGL-UA 565 Prerequisite: Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Topic varies each term. Consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

Modern Poetry in English

ENGL-UA 600 Formerly Modern British and American Poetry. Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112) or Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Readings from poets writing in English from roughly 1850 to 1930, such as Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Thomas Hardy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Claude McKay, H.D., Mina Loy, Langston Hughes, and T.S. Eliot.

Contemporary British and American Literature
ENGL-UA 601 Prerequisite: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111), Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112), or Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Readings in late 20th- and early 21st-century poetry and fiction.

Contemporary British Literature and Culture
ENGL-UA 607 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Studies in contemporary British fiction, exploring postwar British culture in an era of profound political and economic change and social upheaval. Examines a range of avant-garde, neorealist, postcolonial, and popular texts that challenge received notions of “Englishness.” Particular attention paid to the interaction between literature and other cultural forms, such as cinema, popular music, and sport.

Modern British Drama
ENGL-UA 614 Identical to DRLIT-UA 245. Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112) or History of Drama and Theatre II (ENGL-UA 126). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Topics and focus vary. Playwrights may include: George Bernard Shaw, John Millington Synge, Sean O’Casey, Brendan Behan, John Osborne, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, Edward Bond, Brian Friel, David Storey, David Hare, David Edgar, Howard Brenton, Pam Gems, Caryl Churchill, and Sarah Daniels.

Transatlantic Modernism
ENGL-UA 615 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered every year. 4 points.
Focus on works written between the two world wars, but may also consider earlier works as well as postmodern writing after 1945. Writers may include Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, Djuna Barnes, Willa Cather, F Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway.

The Irish Renaissance
ENGL-UA 621 Identical to IRISH-UA 621. Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Covers the tumultuous period from the fall of Charles Stuart Parnell, through the Easter Rising in 1916, and into the early years of national government in the 1930s. Readings in various genres (poetry, short story, novel, drama). Writers may include Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Lady Gregory, John Millington Synge, Sean O’Casey, Samuel Beckett, and Flann O’Brien.

Irish American Literature

ENGL-UA 622 Identical to IRISH-UA 622. 4 points.
From the 19th century to the present. Examines the literary responses of generations of Irish immigrants to the American experience. The works of writers such as Fitzgerald, O’Neill, O’Connor, O’Hara, and Kennedy are explored, as are the connections between ethnic and literary cultures.

James Joyce
ENGL-UA 625 Prerequisite: Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Study of James Joyce’s majors works. Readings will span the entire oeuvre, from Dubliners to Finnegans Wake, with a detailed reading of Ulysses.

20th-Century American Writers
ENGL-UA 626 Prerequisite: Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Topic varies each term. Consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

20th-Century American Poetry
ENGL-UA 630 Formerly American Poetry, 1900-present. Prerequisite: Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered periodically. 4 points.
Study of the development of 20th-century poetry.

Modern American Drama
ENGL-UA 650 Identical to DRLIT-UA 250. Prerequisite: History of Drama and Theatre I (ENGL-UA 125), History of Drama and Theatre II (ENGL-UA 126), or Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Study of the drama and theatre of America since 1900, including O’Neill, Glaspell, the Group Theatre, Wilder, Williams, Miller, Albee, Shepard, Mamet, Fornes, and Hwang.

Irish Dramatists
ENGL-UA 700 Identical to IRISH-UA 700, THEA-UT 603, DRLIT-UA 700. 4 points.
A study of the rich dramatic tradition of Ireland since the days of Yeats, Lady Gregory, and the fledgling Abbey Theatre. Playwrights covered include Synge, O’Casey, Beckett, Behan, Friel, Murphy, McGuinness, and Devlin. Issues of Irish identity, history, and postcoloniality are engaged alongside an appreciation of the poetic achievements and theatrical innovations that characterize this body of work.

The Postcolonial Writer
ENGL-UA 708 Prerequisite: Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Study of the works of a single author (varies by semester), most often a recent Anglophone writer from one of Britain’s former colonies in Africa, South Asia, or the Caribbean. The postcolonial literary canon includes writers who have won international recognition, marked by awards like the Nobel Prize for Literature (Wole Soyinka, V. S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott) or the Man Booker Prize in Britain (Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Kiran Desai).

Major Texts in Critical Theory
ENGL-UA 712 Prerequisite: Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101). Offered every semester. 4 points.
Study of the major texts in critical theory from Plato to Derrida, considered in terms of their historical development. Topics and thinkers associated with such modern movements as historicism, psychoanalytic criticism, feminism, queer theory, subaltern studies, postcolonial theory, deconstruction, affect theory, and eco-criticism.

History and Literatures of the South Asian Diaspora
ENGL-UA 721 Identical to HIST-UA 326, SCA-UA 313. Offered every year. 4 points.
Introduces the many and varied fictions produced by diasporic South Asians across the globe over the last 150 years in Australia, Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean. Explores the poetics and politics of immigration and draws on a wide range of media (including literature, cinema, and music). Particular attention to the diverse geographies of Asian migration: plantations, dance floors, restaurants, and call centers. Themes include coolietude, globalization, the impact of 9/11, and technoservitude.

Digital Literary Studies
ENGL-UA 731 Prerequisite: Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101). Offered every year. 4 points.
How digital texts, resources, and media, and computational tools and methods are transforming literary studies. Topics: how access to online literary texts, criticism, scholarly resources, and archives affects the study of literature; new analyses of literary texts and new evidence for literary arguments that computational tools and methods make possible; how dispersed readers and scholars collaboratively produce knowledge; and the nature and significance of online forums and modes of communication (blogs, Twitter, Facebook, etc.).

Topics in Contemporary Literary Theory
ENGL-UA 735 Prerequisite: Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101). Offered every year. 4 points.
Topic varies each term. Consult the department’s undergraduate website for further information.

Representations of Women
ENGL-UA 755 Identical to SCA-UA 734. Prerequisite: Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Study of literary representations of gender as they intersect class, race, nation, and sexuality. Readings will likely include works by Mary Wollstonecraft, Phyllis Wheatley, Charlotte Brontë, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, Toni Morrison, and others.

Topics
ENGL-UA 800 Topics determine prerequisites. May be taken four times for credit as topics change. 4 points.
Topics vary based on the interests of faculty and students.

The Contemporary Literature Lab
ENGL-UA 995 May be repeated for credit. 2 points.
Bridges scholarly and professional training. Topics vary and include: literary publishing, forums for literary discussion and criticism, literary organizations and institutions, and the possibilities and challenges of writing scholarly literary criticism about contemporary literature.

Senior Seminars

All majors must take one of the following seminars. Topics vary by semester; consult the department’s website for details. Prerequisites for all senior seminars: Introduction to the Study of Literature (ENGL-UA 101) and three of the following: Literatures in English I (ENGL-UA 111), Literatures in English II (ENGL-UA 112), Literatures in English III (ENGL-UA 113), Literatures in English IV (ENGL-UA 114), or permission of the instructor. Majors in the creative writing track must complete these four courses plus Reading as a Writer (ENGL-UA 201) before taking one of these seminars. Note: all were formerly listed as “Topics” courses.

Senior Seminar: Medieval Literature
ENGL-UA 950 Identical to MEDI-UA 953. 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Renaissance Literature
ENGL-UA 951 Identical to MEDI-UA 954. 4 points.

Senior Seminar: 17th-Century British Literature
ENGL-UA 952 Identical to MEDI-UA 955. 4 points.

Senior Seminar: 18th-Century British Literature
ENGL-UA 953 4 points.

Senior Seminar: 19th-Century British Literature
ENGL-UA 954 4 points.

Senior Seminar: 20th-Century British Literature
ENGL-UA 955 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Early American Literature
ENGL-UA 960 4 points.

Senior Seminar: 19th-Century American Literature
ENGL-UA 961 4 points.

Senior Seminar: 20th-Century American Literature
ENGL-UA 962 4 points.

Senior Seminar: African American Literature
ENGL-UA 963 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Emergent American Literatures
ENGL-UA 964 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Transatlantic Literature
ENGL-UA 965 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Critical Theories and Methods
ENGL-UA 970 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Dramatic Literature
ENGL-UA 971 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Genre Studies
ENGL-UA 972 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Interdisciplinary Study
ENGL-UA 973 4 points.

Senior Seminar: Poetry and Poetics
ENGL-UA 974 4 points.

Senior Seminar: World Literature in English
ENGL-UA 975 4 points.

Senior Seminar: New York Literature and Culture

ENGL-UA 976 4 points.

Creative Writing Track Capstone

Creative Writing Capstone Project
ENGL-UA 910 Restricted to English majors in the creative writing track with an approved proposal. Prerequisites: the five core courses for this major track (ENGL-UA 101, 201, and three out of the following four courses: ENGL-UA 111, ENGL-UA 112, ENGL-UA 113, ENGL-UA 114); Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction and Poetry (CRWRI-UA 815); and one intermediate level CRWRI-UA course. Corequisite: Creative Writing Capstone Colloquium (ENGL-UA 911). Offered in the spring. 2 points.
Students typically produce a novella, a poetry chapbook, a collection of short stories, or a work of a hybrid genre. Requires frequent conferences with the project director. Proposals, approved by the student’s faculty advisor, must be submitted in advance of the registration period for the term in which the capstone project is to be conducted.

Creative Writing Capstone Colloquium
ENGL-UA 911 Restricted to English majors in the creative writing track with an approved proposal. Prerequisites: the five core courses for this major track (ENGL-UA 101, 201, and three out of the following four courses: ENGL-UA 111, ENGL-UA 112, ENGL-UA 113, ENGL-UA 114); Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction and Poetry (CRWRI-UA 815); and one intermediate level CRWRI-UA course. Corequisite: Creative Writing Capstone Project (ENGL-UA 910). Offered in the spring. 2 points.
Meets approximately eight times during the semester to workshop writing projects and engage collectively in the writing process.

Honors Courses

Senior Honors Thesis
ENGL-UA 925 Prerequisites: successful completion of the major’s senior seminar requirement and permission of the director of undergraduate studies. 2 or 4 points per term.
Two terms required of all honors students. Weekly individual conferences with the faculty thesis director. Students must also concurrently enroll in two terms of a colloquium for thesis writers (ENGL-UA 926). The default expectation for ENGL-UA 925 is 2 points per term; students must obtain permission from the department to register for 4 points.

Senior Honors Colloquium
ENGL-UA 926 Prerequisites: successful completion of the major’s senior seminar requirement and permission of the director of undergraduate studies. 2 points per term.
Two terms required of all honors students, taken concurrently with two terms of thesis writing (ENGL-UA 925). Meets approximately eight times each term.

Internship and Independent Study

Internship
ENGL-UA 980, 981 Prerequisite: permission of the department’s internship director. Restricted to English majors and minors. May not be used to fulfill the minimum requirements of the major or minor. Graded Pass/Fail. 2 or 4 points per term, with a maximum of 8 total internship points allowed.
Requires a commitment of 8 to 15 hours of work per week in an unpaid position approved by the department’s internship director. The intern’s duties should involve some aspect of literary work, whether in research, writing, editing, or production. A written evaluation is solicited from the intern’s supervisor. Grading based on internship seminar attendance, a final reflection paper, and other shorter assignments submitted to the department’s internship director.

Independent Study
ENGL-UA 997, 998 Prerequisite: permission of the director of undergraduate studies. May not duplicate the content of a regularly offered course. Intended for qualified junior and senior English majors or minors, but may not be used to fulfill the minimum requirements of the major or minor. 2 or 4 points per term.
Requires a paper of considerable length and frequent conferences with the student’s director. The paper should show the student’s ability to investigate, collect, and evaluate material, and to reach conclusions that are discussed in a sound and well-written argument. Proposals, approved by the student’s faculty director, must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies in advance of the registration period for the term in which the independent study is to be conducted.

Graduate Courses Open to Undergraduate English Majors

Junior and senior English majors may take 1000-level ENGL-GA courses in the Graduate School of Arts and Science with permission from the director of undergraduate studies. Consult the department’s graduate website for descriptions of 1000-level courses being offered in a given term.

Undergraduate Program

Welcome to the undergraduate Creative Writing Program. Located in the very heart of literary Greenwich Village, the undergraduate program offers students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the writing life with workshops, readings, internships, writing prizes, and events designed to cultivate and inspire.

Our distinguished faculty of award-winning poets, novelists, short story writers, and memoirists represents a wide array of contemporary aesthetics. In recent years, our creative writing instructors have been the recipients of Pulitzer Prizes, National Book and National Book Critics Circle Awards, NEA Fellowships, Guggenheim Fellowships, Pushcart Prizes, a Whitbread First Novel Award, and the Whiting Writers Award.

Our popular Minor in Creative Writing provides students with an exciting progression of coursework, ranging from an introduction to the fundamentals of the craft to more advanced explorations of specific forms, techniques, and genres. Courses are offered in New York, as well as at a number of NYU Study Away sites. Intensive Seminars—to which students may apply following completion of the foundational Creative Writing: Intro to Fiction & Poetry course (or equivalent)—provide intensive mentoring and guidance for select undergraduate writers. Recent Intensive Seminar faculty have included Chris Adrian, Emily Barton, Jo Ann Beard, Anne Carson & Robert Currie, Junot Díaz, Michael Dickman, Aleksandar Hemon, Marie Howe, David Lipsky, Sarah Manguso, Rick Moody, Eileen Myles, Meghan O’Rourke, Susan Orlean, Jess Row, Zadie Smith, Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, Darin Strauss, Colson Whitehead, and Rachel Zucker.

Students seeking intensive summer study with acclaimed faculty can choose from three exciting undergraduate summer writing programs: Writers in Florence, Writers in New York, and Writers in Paris. These programs offer writers opportunities to develop their craft while living the writer’s life in Florence, Greenwich Village, or Paris. Each intensive program is four weeks and awards eight points of credit. In addition to these summer programs, we offer three-week workshops during the January Term and several on-campus summer workshops during both of NYU’s six-week summer sessions.

The Undergraduate Creative Writing Program also has a strong presence outside of the classroom. Students are encouraged to attend our Reading Series, participate in departmental writing contests and special events for undergraduates, explore internship opportunities, keep abreast of literary news and events via our Undergraduate Listserv, and contribute to our undergraduate literary journal, West 10th, as writers or editors.

If you have questions about the undergraduate Creative Writing Program, please look over our Undergraduate FAQ or contact us by phone (212-998-8816) or email ([email protected]).