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Creative writing related careers

9 Jobs for Creative Writing Majors Where You’ll Actually Use Your Degree

Try as we might, most of us won’t rocket out of undergrad with a BFA in creative writing and a book deal with Random House. But if you do your degree right, you will come out with solid skills in communication, rhetoric, critical thinking, organization, research, attention to detail, and perhaps most importantly, the ability to handle and make use of criticism. Not to mention how well-read you’ll be.

Creative writing majors get a bad rap, criticized for pursuing a degree with no clear job trajectory. But that’s the advantage of being a creative writing major—there are so many things you can do with it.

Here are nine jobs for creative writing majors that will actually let you use your degree.

1. Technical writer/editor

Technical writers and editors are ultra detail-oriented professionals who write manuals, instructions, processes, and guidelines. They deal with regulations and laws and serve as keepers of precise language. If you pursue this kind of career, you might work in medicine or pharma (which often requires a little extra training and a certification or two), nuclear regulation, engineering (of all kinds), software, government, or finance. Technical writing salaries typically start in the $50,000s and can exceed $100,000.

2. Communications coordinator/manager/director

Like tech writers, communications professionals are employable across all kinds of industries—finance, PR, marketing, NGOs, health care, software, museums, technology, travel, consumer goods, media, education, law, government—pretty much anywhere a company or organization needs to communicate with clients or customers or, in large organizations, a lot of people within the company. In this kind of position you might write press releases and memos, craft corporate messaging, or even dabble in email, social media, or marketing campaigns. Your salary will vary widely based on your industry and experience.

3. Podcaster

It’s a legit job, folks, and a lucrative one at that. Host your own or land a job as a producer, which can make you about $65,000 per year. The barrier to entry is pretty low, but competition is high to stand out in a flooded market. But you’ve got those excellent storytelling skills, so we feel like you’ve got this.

4. Professor/academic

You’ll need at least an MFA in creative writing (or a Ph.D. in English, depending on what you’d like to teach and how high you’d like to climb) if you’d like to teach at the college level, but it’s a career that will afford you the time to write, and will even require it of you. Creative writing professors and English professors make about $60,000 per year (more if you make tenure).

5. Editor

Editors do more than work on book-length manuscripts at publishing houses. Editors can work across industries—marketing, business, law, government, nonprofits, magazines and online publications, tech, and anywhere you might need to deal with language (i.e., everywhere). Expect to start out as a copy editor (also called a line editor) or research editor and move up to deal with editorial strategy as a whole. The salaries for editors vary depending on the industry and can range from $40,000 to $100,000+.

6. Public relations professional

Your ability to communicate clearly and gracefully deal with criticism can set you up well for a career in public relations. PR pros liaise between organizations and the media/public, craft messaging, and come up with ways to deal with the heat in crisis scenarios. In some organizations, PR overlaps, sometimes significantly, with communications jobs like the one mentioned above. An entry-level PR job can net you about $58,000, while those at the director level can expect to earn anywhere from $80,000 to well into the six figures.

7. Journalist

Journalists can work for newspapers, magazines, online publications, broadcast news, podcasts, and radio stations—or you can set your own schedule and go freelance. Journalists pull down mid-$30,000 to $80,000 per year.

8. Columnist

Columnists need to be an “expert” in something (or at the very least, a keen observer of)—it might be politics, social issues, film, books, feminism, wine, travel, or culture. If you hope to land a column, start a blog about your area of expertise to build a robust portfolio. Columnists make $40,000 to $70,000 per year.

9. Librarian

I can’t think of many things better than spending your day among books. You’ll need a master’s degree in library science to be a librarian, but your degree in creative writing is a natural lead-in to such a program. Librarians make an average of $57,000 per year.

What I Wish I Knew as a Creative Writing Major

I thought I’d make a career out of writing. That’s what I went to college for. I majored in English: Creative Writing because I loved it. I enjoyed sitting in the classroom, talking to my peers about short stories and poetry… until my senior year rolled around.

What was after college? What was I going to do with this degree that I so loved pursuing? Could I really make a career out of writing?

I worked a slew of odd jobs and writing internships before I landed at Pearson as a Registrar Support Specialist, something I never imagined I’d be doing. Now that I’m 30 and working a job I enjoy, I look back on my college career wishing I had known a few things before graduating. Things like what jobs I could get with this degree and what skills should I be learning to better prepare me for life after college—because it turns out, life after college wasn’t anything like I’d imagined.

If you’re considering majoring in Creative Writing, here are a few things to keep in mind:

A Degree Doesn’t Always Mean A Job

The first question for any English major is “what do you hope to do with an English degree?” It’s a legitimate question and sometimes a hard one. What can one do with an English degree other than teach? Is a creative writing degree even marketable?

As a whole, the purpose of getting a college degree is not primarily about getting a job. The purpose of going to college is to educate yourself, grow as a person, and gain experience and knowledge that will last you a lifetime.

I don’t think I’d be writing this post or any of my past blog posts if I hadn’t pursued writing in college and worked as a writing intern for a couple years. However, I don’t think I would have ended up in my current position as a registrar support specialist—the job that actually pays my bills—if I hadn’t gotten 8+ years of administrative experience and a couple years of management experience alongside my degree.

Just because you’re getting a Creative Writing degree doesn’t mean you’ll end up as a best-selling author or poet. If you want to make yourself marketable for a wide array of jobs, consider gaining specialized experience alongside your writing education.

So, what are some creative job ideas for creative writing majors? Here are just a few ideas:

Marketing communications or copywriting

Web content writer or blogger

Social media specialist

Are you looking to get a college degree? Accelerated Pathways offers custom degree plans that allow students to achieve their degree and save money. Reach out to our student counselors to get more specialized degree guidance and information about our programs.

A note on freelancing

Thanks to the internet, the demand for freelance writers has grown. Some companies seek help for projects that require excellent writing and communication skills but don’t feel the need to hire someone full-time, so they turn to agencies and job boards that can get the word out. This is a great opportunity for the entrepreneurial-minded writer.

A few such agencies are The Creative Group, Creative Circle, and 24 Seven. You simply give them your resume and portfolio, indicate what kind of work you’re looking for, and they dish out your resume to jobs that may be a good fit. You can also browse job opportunities on their websites on your own and send your resume.

Check job boards like Indeed or LinkedIn. You can often find someone looking for a writer, editor, or expert communicator for various reasons. Just make sure you do a bit of research into the job and/or the company so you know what you’re getting yourself into.

Learn Non-Writing Skills

I love writing short stories and poems. Some of my best college memories are writing stories for my peers to review or talking to my writing professor about how to be a better writer over burgers. The skills I learned by taking writing courses are skills that I cherish even years after graduation.

However, looking back, I wish I had learned more skills than just creative writing. There’s more to jobs and careers than just simply writing. A lot of other skills and knowledge are necessary as well.

For example, I wish I had learned more about marketing and branding. This may have opened up opportunities for me in marketing and communications. For instance, when I interned for a branding agency, I had no idea what Search Engine Optimization (SEO) was or what the difference was between user experience and user interface. Were these pertinent to my role there? Not really, but my co-workers talked about them a lot, and I often felt lost.

Writing is great but learn other things too.

Don’t take odd jobs for granted either. Before I landed my job at Pearson, I worked as a front desk agent at a hotel, as a receiving assistant manager in a grocery store, and had a temporary job for a standardized testing service. While none of these by any means are dream jobs, I learned valuable skills in customer service, administration, management, and communication.

These odd jobs can be good ways to learn other skills that can give you a leg up in the race for employment, and while learning new skills or improving them, these various jobs can also help give you a boost in creativity based on your everyday interactions or duties.

Use Your Minor to Specialize

Minors are another great way to get some perspective in other fields.

On average, a minor takes up approximately 15-18 credits and usually helps fill up elective space in your degree. Don’t fill yours with writing classes. Some minors I would recommend to someone majoring in creative writing are education, business (specifically marketing, if available), journalism, and communications. All of these fields require creative writing in some way, and they are fields you’re most likely to pursue after college.

But ultimately, minor in anything you’re interested in. This will help you learn more, and give you more to write about! Besides, following your interests is a great way to land a job you love.

Pursue Internships

You’ll hear a lot of negative things about internships, like how they don’t pay well (or at all) or don’t teach you enough. To be honest, these things are true. But don’t be so quick to throw out the opportunity.

There are many well-meaning companies offering college students the opportunity to learn practical, on-the-job skills, and sometimes an internship can be a stepping stone to something better.

Making the decision to pursue an internship can be tough, and it comes with risks. You may not make any money, you might be new to the field, and you seriously have no idea what you’re doing. So, here are things you can do when pursuing an internship:

Make a budget. Can you afford to do something for free with the hope of something better in the future? After all, you do need to eat and to pay for the gas to get to your internship.

Make a list of local companies that may offer internships in your desired field. This may include companies that require you to commute, which will affect the aforementioned budget.

Contact your advisor and/or professors. They may have some very helpful information and connections. Depending on your school, degree, or major, you may even be required to complete an internship for graduation.

Treat it just like searching for any other job. You’ll be competing with hundreds—maybe thousands—of other eager students like yourself. You can’t win them all, but you should be persistent, professional, and confident.

When you interview for an internship, listen and ask good questions. Make sure you understand what the interviewer is asking of you, and if you don’t know something, ask because you’re there to learn.

Pursue What You Value

When deciding on a major, a minor, side jobs, or any of the myriad of decisions you’ll make in college, it’s important to know what you want to do in the future and set goals. These goals will help orient you and make the decision-making process a lot easier.

But even more important than setting goals is defining your values. The things you value are the motivators for reaching your goals. These values answer the question of “why?” Why do you want to achieve this or that goal? Why is this goal important to you?

For example, as a writer, I want to get a short story published, a common goal that many writers share. The value (or the motivator to reach this goal) is that I want to tell people about the things I care about, struggle with, and think about, to share my story and my perspective. That value is true even as I write this blog post. If and when I achieve this goal, I will make a new goal, but my values will remain more or less consistent for months and years to come, possibly for the rest of my life.

It’s your values that will carry you through all of the writing, job searching, skill acquiring, and interning you can muster, not your goals. So, what do you value? How do those values motivate you to reach your goals or your dream job as it were?

As long as you consistently pursue what you value, no matter what other choices you make about your major, you’re guaranteed to walk toward a meaningful future career.

Learn more about how Accelerated Pathways can help you get an affordable English degree that also gives you the flexibility you need to build other important career skills at the same time.

Levi is a Registrar Support Specialist here at Pearson by day, short-story author by night. When he’s not working (or writing), you can find him playing board games with friends, playing guitar, watching tv with his wife, or eating a delicious home-cooked meal.

Creative writing

A degree in creative writing allows you to develop your writing, research and creative thinking skills. You’ll also gain skills that are useful in a range of other careers such as publishing, marketing, PR and teaching

Job options

Jobs directly related to your degree include:

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:

Remember that many employers accept applications from graduates with any degree subject, so don’t restrict your thinking to the jobs listed here.

Take a few minutes to answer the Job Match quiz and find out what careers would suit you

Work experience

Building a portfolio of written work, especially any that you’ve had published, will help to evidence your writing skills and establish your reputation as a writer.

You can gain valuable experience by writing for your student newspaper or magazine, volunteering in schools, or getting involved with writers’ groups. Also, try submitting work to journals or anthologies, entering competitions, performing at spoken word events or approaching local drama groups to see if they will use your scripts. This will boost your profile and help build your confidence.

To make yourself more employable, look for opportunities to gain some solid work experience. This could be in the form of paid administrative work for a company or volunteering, perhaps with a local charity helping them to promote the work they do.

You could also write speculatively to a number of businesses, including publishing houses and marketing firms, to ask if you could complete some short-term work experience or shadowing. This can have the advantage of getting you a foot in the door in a highly-competitive industry and could lead to a permanent position.

As well as creative talent and writing experience, you will also need perseverance and determination to succeed as a writer.

Search for placements and find out more about work experience and internships.

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Typical employers

As a creative writing graduate you may work to establish yourself as a writer on a self-employed basis, either writing your own works, or writing for others in a freelance capacity.

Alternatively, you could find opportunities with a variety of employers, including:

  • publishing houses or editorial/technical writing service companies
  • advertising, marketing and public relations agencies, particularly in a copywriting capacity
  • primary, secondary, further and higher education institutions
  • media organisations and social media companies
  • general businesses – in an administrative or general management position
  • Civil Service, library or charitable organisations.

Employers hiring creative writing graduates now

Product Developer

  • CGP Books
  • Cumbria
  • £24,501-£27,000
Where will your words shine?

Publishing. Media. Theatre. Study MA Creative Writing. Hone your craft into a lifelong career

Skills for your CV

As well as building specialist knowledge of creative writing, you also develop effective written, oral and presentation skills through your degree. Other skills include:

  • creative thinking and problem solving – these skills are useful for many jobs and you’ll have gained them from developing characters and storylines
  • independent working – having to be self-motivated as a writer means you can effectively determine and direct your own workload
  • time management and organisation – learning to structure your time effectively as a writer means you can be highly organised
  • a good understanding of information technology
  • collaboration – from liaising with students from other related courses such as journalism and film studies
  • independent research and analysis – you’ll be adept at this from turning ideas into well-rounded stories
  • editorial and proofreading – from producing accurately written content
  • negotiation and networking – learning how to market your work effectively gives you the skill to negotiate in other workplace settings.

Further study

As a creative writing graduate you can develop your creative writing skills further by undertaking further study at Masters or PhD level. You can also specialise in an area such as screenwriting, the graphic novel, writing for young people, writing poetry, or writing and producing comedy.

Alternatively, you may want to undertake further vocational training in areas such as teaching, journalism, librarianship or publishing. Vocational courses allow you to study in an area in which you would like to have a career.

You may also want to consider further study in areas such as PR, marketing or advertising.

For more information on further study and to find a course that interests you, see Masters degrees and search postgraduate courses in creative writing.

What do creative writing graduates do?

A tenth (11%) of creative writing graduates who are in employment in the UK are working as authors, writers and translators, while 6% are working as marketing associate professionals.

Destination Percentage
Employed 61.3
Further study 7.1
Working and studying 14.3
Unemployed 11.6
Other 5.7
Type of work Percentage
Retail, catering and customer service 26.1
Arts, design and media 18.4
Clerical, secretarial and administrative 15
Marketing, PR and sales 10.2
Other 30.3

Find out what other creative writing graduates are doing 15 months after finishing their degrees in What do graduates do?