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Creative writing quick writes

34 Quick Writing Prompts

Come explore and discover our fabulous list of quick writing prompts— Yes, we love to spark the imaginations of your students and writers and would love to help you jumpstart their next quick write project. Read on to discover how.

A Quick & Short Piece of Writing of Your Own Choosing

Quick and short (or not) any writer will tell you that getting started is often one of the hardest parts of writing—and for kids who are inexperienced or who lack confidence in their writing, getting started can be even more of a challenge.

A good, quick writing prompt is one of the best and simplest ways to kick-start creativity and get the inspiration flowing!

You see, this all-new list of quick write prompts for students is designed to help kids who are feeling stuck move past their writer’s blocks.

These prompts cover a variety of topics and use several methods to help students dive right into their newest pieces of writing.

While some questions call for reflection and self-analysis, others focus on description, hypothetical dreams, and imagination. However, they all share one important trait in common: each prompt is easy to read and to begin answering immediately.

Quick Writing Prompts

Use one of these 34 quick writing prompts anytime your students say that they don’t know what to write about—or when they simply need a little bit of extra creativity.

  1. What does the city sound like at night?
  2. What is the coolest thing that can be found in nature?
  3. How can you tell whether or not someone will be a good friend?
  4. Write about a time when you told a lie that you shouldn’t have.
  5. Have you ever been embarrassed by something your family did? Why or why not?
  6. Write about something you are excited to do when you get to college.
  7. Do you ever feel like your moods change with the season? Why or why not?
  8. What is the best thing you’ve ever tasted? Would you eat it every day if you could?
  9. Write about a time when you felt like you could do anything.
  10. In what ways have you changed over the past five years?
  11. What is the most unusual thing you’ve ever seen?
  12. What is your favorite thing about yourself? Why?
  13. What memory from your childhood stands out most clearly in your mind?
  14. Write about a time when you witnessed something unfair.
  15. What is the nicest thing someone has ever done for you?
  16. What is your favorite place in the world? What makes it so special? How do you feel when you go there?

Best Practices to Build Students’ Confidence

The following is an excerpt from “The Quickwrite Handbook 100 Mentor Texts to Jumpstart Your Students’ Thinking and Writing” by Linda Rief.

The Benefits of Quickwrites

Writing and teaching writing can be intimidating. It is hard work, and it takes time. Quickwrites offer an easy and manageable writing experience that helps both students and teachers find their voices and develop their confidence, as they discover that they have important things to say. This quick exercise pulls words out of the writer’s mind, and I am always surprised at the precision of language, level of depth and detail, and clarity of focus I hear when a student reads a three-minute quickwrite out loud. When the models for quickwrites are compelling and carefully chosen, students are able to focus closely and write clearly.

Over the years of using these invitations to write with students in my classroom and with teachers in workshops and courses, I’ve discovered so many of their benefits:

Quickwrites bring out the writer. They:
• give students ideas and frames for their writing so that they are not
working in a void.
• focus students’ attention and stimulate their thinking at the beginning of a class.
• provide and capture the seeds of ideas for more expanded pieces.
• encourage writing about important ideas, chosen to make us think and feel as
we learn.
• give students choices about what they write, how they write, and what
works and does not work.
• help students focus on one subject in great detail by giving them examples
filled with sensory detail.
• introduce students to a variety of stylistic devices and craft lessons they
might try in their writing.

Quickwrites build students’ confidence. They:
• offer surprise when students discover that they didn’t realize how much
they knew, or what they were thinking, until they began writing.
• build confidence when students see the quality of their writing.
• make writing accessible to all students, even those who struggle the most
with words and ideas, because quickwrites are short, quick, non-threatening, and directed toward a specific task.

Quickwrites develop fluency. They:
• keep students writing several times a week.
• keep students writing beyond the quickwrite when they find themselves
committed to a topic that matters to them.
• offer ongoing practice for writing in sensible, realistic, and meaningful
ways on demand or in timed situations.

Quickwrites bring out the reader. They:
• teach students to become better readers as they hear, see, and craft language.
• teach students critical reading as they choose significant lines, and then
draft and reconsider their ideas in the clearest ways.
• provide examples of fine, compelling writing from their peers, their teacher,
and professional writers.
• introduce students to a variety of writers: poets, essayists, and fiction and
nonfiction writers.

Quickwrites help teachers grow as writers. They
• allow us time to write for two to three minutes each class period.
• help us find ideas for writing and our voices as writers.
• clarify our understanding of the difficulty of the task we are asking students to complete, because we’re doing what we’ve asked them to do.

There is no doubt that a quick write practice will do wonders to help improve your student understanding of this particular style of writing. So get to it and use these ideas and resources today. I think you’ll be glad you did.

Until next time, write on…

If you enjoyed these Quick Writing Prompts for Middle School Students,
please share them on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Pinterest.
I appreciate it!

Sincerely,
Jill
journalbuddies.com
creator and curator

SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips

The most common advice out there for being a writer is, “if you want to write, write.” While this is true (and good advice), it’s not always that easy, particularly if you’re not writing regularly.

Whether you’re looking for help getting started on your next project, or just want to spend 20 minutes being creative, writing prompts are great ways to rev up your imagination. Read on for our list of over 100 creative writing prompts!

feature image credit: r. nial bradshaw/Flickr

10 Short Writing Prompts

If you’re looking for a quick boost to get yourself going, these 10 short writing prompts will do the trick.

#1: Write a scene starting with a regular family ritual that goes awry.

#2: Describe exactly what you see/smell/hear/etc, right now. Include objects, people, and anything else in your immediate environment.

#3: Suggest eight possible ways to get a ping pong ball out of a vertical pipe.

#4: A shoe falls out of the sky. Justify why.

#5: If your brain were a tangible, physical place, what would it be like?

#6: Begin your writing with the phrase, “The stage was set.”

#7: You have been asked to write a history of “The Summer of [this past year].” Your publisher wants a table of contents. What events will you submit?

#8: Write a sympathetic story from the point of view of the “bad guy.” (Think fractured fairy tales like Wicked or The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs!, although the story doesn’t have to be a fairy tale.)

#9: Look at everyday objects in a new way and write about the stories one of these objects contains.

#10: One person meets a stranger on a mode of transportation. Write the story that ensues.

What stories might be happening on this train?

11 Writing Prompts for Kids

Any of these prompts can be used by writers of any age, but we chose the following 11 prompts as ones that would be particularly fun for kids to write about. (Most of them I used myself as a young writer, so I can vouch for their working!)

#1: Include something falling in your writing.

#2: Write a short poem (or story) with the title, “We don’t know when it will be fixed.”

#3: Write from the perspective of someone of a different gender than you.

#4: Write a dumb internet quiz.

#5: Finish this thought: “A perfect day in my imagination begins like this:”

#6: Write a character’s inner monologue (what they are thinking as they go about their day).

#7: Think of a character. Write a paragraph each about:

  • An important childhood experience that character had.
  • The character’s living situation.
  • Two hobbies or things the character likes to do.
  • The room where the character sleeps.
  • An ambition of the character.
  • Two physical characteristics of the character.
  • What happens when a second person and this character meet.
  • Two important defining personal traits of this character.

#8: Start a story with a quote from a song.

#9: Begin a story with, “It was the summer of ______ when ______”

#10: Pretend everyday objects have no names. Think about what you would name them based on what they do, what you can use them for, and what they look like.

#11: Start a story with the phrases “My grandparents are/were,” “My parents are/were,” or “My mother/father/parent is/was.”

My grandfather was. skiing in his bathrobe and a Santa hat??

15 Cool Writing Prompts

#1: List five issues that you’re passionate about. Write about them from the opposite point of view (or from the perspective of a character with the opposite point of view).

#2: Walk around and write down a phrase you hear (or read). Make a story out of it.

#3: Write using no adjectives or adverbs.

#4: Write a character’s inner dialogue between different aspects of a character’s self (rather than an inner monologue).

#5: Write a true story from your past that involves light or darkness in some way.

#6: “Saying goodbye awakens us to the true nature of things.” Write something in which someone has to say goodbye and has a realization.

#7: Begin by writing the end of the story.

#8: Write a recipe for an intangible thing.

#9: Write a horror story about an ordinary situation (e.g., buying groceries, going to the bank, listening to music).

#10: Write a story from within a bubble.

#11: Write down 2-3 short character descriptions and then write the characters in conversation with one another.

#12: Write a story in second person.

#13: Write a story that keeps contradicting itself.

#14: Write about a character with at least three big problems.

#15: Write something that takes place on a Friday, the 13th (of any month).

15 Funny Writing Prompts

#1: Write a story which starts with someone eating a pickle and potato sandwich.

#2: Write a short script where the plot has to do with evil dolls trying to take over something.

#3: Write about writers’ block.

#4: List five election issues that would be ridiculous to includes as part of your election platform (e.g. outlawing mechanical pencils and clicky pens, mandating every person over the age of 30 must own an emergency last rites kit). Choose one of the ridiculous issues and write a speech in favor of it.

#5: Write a children’s story that is insanely inappropriate but can’t use graphic language, curses, or violence.

#6: List five careers. Write about someone with one of those careers who wants to quit it.

#7: Write down a list of murder methods. Choose one at random from the list to use in a story.

#8: Write a romance story in which the hero must have a last name corresponding with a physical characteristic (e.g. Jacques Hairyback or Flora Dimple).

#9: Come up with 10 different ways to:

  • say hello
  • order a pizza
  • congratulate someone on a job well done
  • apologize
  • return to the store something that’s broken

#10: Search for “random Renaissance painting” (or any other inspirational image search text you can think of) on any online internet image search engine. Picking one image, write half a page each of:

  • Statements about this image (e.g. “I meant bring me the BREAD of John the Baptist”).
  • Questions about this image (e.g. “How many of those cherubs look like their necks are broken?”).
  • Explanations of this image (e.g. “The painter ran out of blue paint halfway through and had to improvise for the color of the sky”).
  • Commands said by people in this image or about this image (e.g. “Stop telling me to smile!” or “Bring me some gasoline!”).

#11: Write starting with a word that sounds like “chute” (e.g. “chute,” “shoot,” “shooed”).

#12: Write about a character named X “The [article of clothing]” Y (e.g. Julie “The Yellow Darted Skirt” Whyte) or simply referred to by their clothing (e.g. “the man in the brown suit” or “the woman in black”).

#13: Write down a paragraph each describing two wildly different settings. Write a story involving both settings.

#14: Think of a fictional holiday based around some natural event (e.g. the Earth being at its farthest point from the sun, in memory of a volcanic eruption, that time a cloud looked like a rabbit riding a bicycle). Write about how this holiday is celebrated.

#15: Write a “Just-So” type story about a fictional creature (e.g. “how the dragon got its firebreath” or “how the mudkip got its cheek gills”).

You can also try to write a Just-So story for the modern era, like “How the Computer Got Its Mouse”or How the Owl. Got Its Headphones? wait what

54 Other Writing Prompt Ideas

#1: Borrow a character from some other form of media (or create your own). Write from that character’s perspective.

#2: Write for and against a non-consequential controversy (e.g., salt vs. pepper, Mac vs. PC, best kind of door).

#3: Choose an ancestor or a person from the past to write about or to.

#4: Write a pirate story with a twist.

#5: Have a character talk about another character and their feelings about that other character.

#6: Pick a season and think about an event in your life that occurred in that season. Write a creative nonfiction piece about that event and that season.

#7: Think of something very complicated and long. Write a page about it using short sentences.

#8: Write a story as a dream.

#9: Describe around a food without ever directly naming it.

#10: Write a monologue (one character, talking to the audience/reader) (*not* an inner monologue).

#11: Begin a story with the phrase, “It only took five seconds to. “

#12: List five strong emotions. Choosing one, write about a character experiencing that emotion, but only use the character’s actions to convey how they are feeling (no outright statements).

#13: Write a chapter of the memoir of your life.

#14: Look through the (physical) things you’re currently carrying with you or wearing. Write about the memories or emotions tied with each of them.

#15: Go be in nature. Write drawing your story from your surroundings (both physical, social, and mental/emotional).

#16: Write from the perspective of a bubble (or bubble-like creature).

#17: A person is jogging along an asphalt road. Write a story.

#18: Title your story (or poem, or play, etc) “Anti-_____”. Fill in the blank and write the story.

#19: Write something that must include an animal, a mineral, and a vegetable.

#20: Begin your writing with the phrase, “6 weeks later. “

#21: List 5-10 office jobs. Pick one of them and describe a person working in that job as if you were a commentator on an Olympic sporting event.

#22: Practice your poetic imagery: overwrite a description of a character’s breakfast routine.

#23: Write about a character (or group of characters) trying to convince another character to try something they’re scared of.

#24: Keep an eye out in your environment for examples of greengrocer’s apostrophes and rogue quotation marks. Pick an example and write about what the misplaced punctuation implies (e.g., we have the “best” meat or we have the best “meat”).

#25: Fill in the blank with the first word that comes to mind: “_______ Riot!” Write a newspaper-style article describing the events that that took place.

#26: Write from the point of view of your most-loved possession. What does it think of you?

#27: Think of five common sayings (e.g., “An apple a day keeps the doctor away”). Write a horror story whose plot is one of those common sayings.

#28: Write a scene in which two characters are finally hashing out a long-standing misunderstanding or disagreement.

#29: You start receiving text messages from an unknown number. Tell the story of what happens next.

#30: Write one character bragging to another about the story behind their new tattoo.

#31: Superheroes save the world. but they also leave a lot of destruction in their wake. Write about a normal person in a superhero’s world.

#32: Sometimes, family is who we are related to; sometimes, family is a group of people we gather around ourselves. Write a story about (some of) a character’s found family and relatives meeting for the first time.

#33: Write a story that begins in the middle of the plot’s action (en media res).

#34: Everyone says you can never have too much of a good thing. Write a story where that isn’t true.

#35: What do ghosts do when they’re not creating mischief? Write about the secret lives of ghosts.

This particular ghost seems to be going on an epic quest to. photograph some ancient artifacts and not steal them? Look, fiction can be whatever you want it to be.

#36: Every year, you dread the last week of April. Write a story about why.

#37: Write a story about what it would be like to have an animal sidekick in real life.

#38: Heists don’t just have to be black-clad thieves stealing into vaults to steal rare art or money. Write about a group of people (adults or children) who commit a heist for something of seemingly little monetary value.

#39: “Life is like a chooseable-path adventure, except you don’t get to see what would have happened if you chose differently.” Think of a choice you’ve made and write about a world where you made a different choice.

#40: Write a story about a secret room.

#41: You find a message in a bottle with very specific directions. Write a story about the adventure you embark upon.

#42: “You’ll always be okay as long as you know where your _______ is.” Fill in the blank and write a story (either fictional or from your life) illustrating this statement.

#43: Forcing people into prolonged proximity can change and deepen relationships. Write about characters on a road trip together.

#44: In music, sonata form includes three main parts: exposition, development, and recapitulation. Write a short story that follows this format.

#45: Begin writing with a character saying, “I’m afraid this simply can’t wait.”

#46: Write a story with a happy ending (either happily-ever-after or happy-for-now).

#47: Write about a character before and after a tragedy in that character’s life.

#48: Choose an object or concept you encounter in everyday life (e.g. tables, the feeling of hot or cold, oxygen) and write an infomercial about it.

#49: “Life is a series of quests, whether important or mundane.” Write about a quest you’ve gone on (or would like to go on, or will have to go on).

#50: List 10 different ways to learn. Choose one (or more) and write a story where a character learns something using that one (or more) method.

#51: You’ve been called to the principal’s office for bad behavior. You know what you did. Explain and justify yourself.

#52: A character discovers their sibling owns a cursed object. Write about what happens next.

#53: Write a character description by writing a list of items that would be on a scavenger hunt about them.

#54: The slogan for a product or service you’re advertising is, “Kid-tested, _____.” Fill in the blank and write the copy for a radio or podcast advertisement for your product.

Touching a goat: Kids-tested

How to Use Creative Writing Prompts

There’s no wrong way to use a creative writing prompt (unless it’s to harass and hurt someone)—the point of them is to get you writing and your imagination flowing.

To help you get the most out of these writing prompts, however, we’ve come up with the six tips below. Try them out!

#1: DON’T Limit Yourself to Prose

Unless you’re writing for a particular assignment, there’s no reason everything you write in response to a writing prompt has to be prose fiction. Instead of writing your response to a prompt as a story, try writing a poem, nonfiction essay, play, screenplay, or some other format entirely.

You never know what combination of prompt and medium will spark your next great poem/story/play/nonfiction essay! Plus, taking a break from writing in the same format all the time might make you think about story structure or language in a different way.

#2: DON’T Edit as You Write

The purposes of writing prompts is to get you writing, typos and weird grammar and all. Editing comes later, once you’ve finished writing and have some space from it to come back to what you wrote.

It’s OK to fix things that will make it difficult to read what you’ve written (e.g., a weird autocorrect that changes the meaning of a sentence), but don’t worry too much about typos or perfect grammar when you’re writing; those are easy enough to fix in edits. You also can always insert asterisks or a short note as you’re writing to remind yourself to go back to fix something (for instance, if as you’re writing it seems like you want to move around the order of your paragraphs or insert something earlier).

#3: DO Interpret the Prompt Broadly

The point of using a writing prompt is not to write something that best exemplifies the prompt, but something that sparks your own creativity. Again, unless you’re writing in response to an assignment with specific directions, feel free to interpret writing prompts as broadly or as narrowly as you want.

For instance, if your prompt is to write a story that begins with “The stage was set,” you could write about anything from someone preparing to put a plan into motion to a literal theatre stage constructed out of pieces of old sets (or something else entirely).

If you’re using a writing prompt, it doesn’t have to be the first sentence of your story or poem, either; you can also use the prompt as a goal to work towards in your writing.

#4: DO Try Switching Up Your Writing Methods

If it’s a possibility for you, see if you write differently in different media. Do you write the same kind of stories by hand as you would typing at a computer? What about if you dictate a story and then transcribe it? Or text it to a friend? Varying the method you use to write can affect the stories you’re able to tell.

For example, you may find that it’s easier for you to tell stories about your life to a voice recorder than to try to write out a personal essay. Or maybe you have trouble writing poetry, but can easily text yourself or a friend a poem. You might even find you like a writing method you’ve not tried before better than what you’ve been doing!

#5: DO Mix and Match Prompt Ideas

If you need more inspiration, feel free to combine multiple prompts (but don’t overwhelm yourself with too much to write about).

You can also try switching genres from what might be suggested in the prompt. For instance, try writing a prompt that seems funny in a serious and sad way, or finding the humor in something that otherwise seems humorless. The categories we’ve organized the prompts into are by no means limiters on what you’re allowed to write about.

#6: DO Try to Write Regularly

The more regularly you write, the easier it will be to write (with or without writing prompts).

For some people, this means writing daily; for others, it means setting aside time to write each weekend or each month. Set yourself an achievable goal (write 2x a week, write 1000 words a month) and stick to it. You can always start small and then ramp your wordcount or frequency up.

If you do better when you have something outside yourself prompting to write, you may also want to try something like morning pages, which encourages you to write at least 750 words every day, in any format (story, diary entry, social media postings, etc).

What’s Next?

Thinking about attending college or grad school for creative writing? Our articles on whether or not you should major in creative writing and the best creative writing programs are there for you! Plus, if you’re a high schooler, you should check out these top writing contests.

Just as writing prompts can help give form to amorphous creative energy, using specific writing structures or devices can be great starting points for your next story. Read through our discussion of the top 20 poetic devices to know and see if you can work at least one new one into your next writing session.

Still looking for more writing ideas? Try repurposing our 100+ easy drawing ideas for characters, settings, or plot points in your writing.

Have friends who also need help with test prep? Share this article!

Laura graduated magna cum laude from Wellesley College with a BA in Music and Psychology, and earned a Master’s degree in Composition from the Longy School of Music of Bard College. She scored 99 percentile scores on the SAT and GRE and loves advising students on how to excel in high school.

105 Creative Writing Exercises To Get You Writing Again

You know that feeling when you just don’t feel like writing? Sometimes you can’t even get a word down on paper. It’s the most frustrating thing ever to a writer, especially when you’re working towards a deadline. The good news is that we have a list of 105 creative writing exercises to help you get motivated and start writing again!

What are creative writing exercises?

Creative writing exercises are short writing activities (normally around 10 minutes) designed to get you writing. The goal of these exercises is to give you the motivation to put words onto a blank paper. These words don’t need to be logical or meaningful, neither do they need to be grammatically correct or spelt correctly. The whole idea is to just get you writing something, anything. The end result of these quick creative writing exercises is normally a series of notes, bullet points or ramblings that you can, later on, use as inspiration for a bigger piece of writing such as a story or a poem.

Good creative writing exercises are short, quick and easy to complete. You shouldn’t need to think too much about your style of writing or how imaginative your notes are. Just write anything that comes to mind, and you’ll be on the road to improving your creative writing skills and beating writer’s block.

Use the generator below to get a random creative writing exercise idea:

List of 105+ Creative Writing Exercises

Here are over 105 creative writing exercises to give your brain a workout and help those creative juices flow again:

  1. Set a timer for 60 seconds. Now write down as many words or phrases that come to mind at that moment.
  2. Pick any colour you like. Now start your sentence with this colour. For example, Orange, the colour of my favourite top.
  3. Open a book or dictionary on a random page. Pick a random word. You can close your eyes and slowly move your finger across the page. Now, write a paragraph with this random word in it. You can even use an online dictionary to get random words:
  1. Create your own alphabet picture book or list. It can be A to Z of animals, food, monsters or anything else you like!
  2. Using only the sense of smell, describe where you are right now.
  3. Take a snack break. While eating your snack write down the exact taste of that food. The goal of this creative writing exercise is to make your readers savour this food as well.
  4. Pick a random object in your room and write a short paragraph from its point of view. For example, how does your pencil feel? What if your lamp had feelings?
  5. Describe your dream house. Where would you live one day? Is it huge or tiny?
  6. Pick two different TV shows, movies or books that you like. Now swap the main character. What if Supergirl was in Twilight? What if SpongeBob SquarePants was in The Flash? Write a short scene using this character swap as inspiration.
  7. What’s your favourite video game? Write at least 10 tips for playing this game.
  8. Pick your favourite hobby or sports. Now pretend an alien has just landed on Earth and you need to teach it this hobby or sport. Write at least ten tips on how you would teach this alien.
  9. Use a random image generator and write a paragraph about the first picture you see.
  1. Write a letter to your favourite celebrity or character. What inspires you most about them? Can you think of a memorable moment where this person’s life affected yours? We have this helpful guide on writing a letter to your best friend for extra inspiration.
  2. Write down at least 10 benefits of writing. This can help motivate you and beat writer’s block.
  3. Complete this sentence in 10 different ways: Patrick waited for the school bus and…
  4. Pick up a random book from your bookshelf and go to page 9. Find the ninth sentence on that page. Use this sentence as a story starter.
  5. Create a character profile based on all the traits that you hate. It might help to list down all the traits first and then work on describing the character.
  6. What is the scariest or most dangerous situation you have ever been in? Why was this situation scary? How did you cope at that moment?
  7. Pretend that you’re a chat show host and you’re interviewing your favourite celebrity. Write down the script for this conversation.
  8. Using extreme detail, write down what you have been doing for the past one hour today. Think about your thoughts, feelings and actions during this time.
  9. Make a list of potential character names for your next story. You can use a fantasy name generator to help you.
  10. Describe a futuristic setting. What do you think the world would look like in 100 years time?
  11. Think about a recent argument you had with someone. Would you change anything about it? How would you resolve an argument in the future?
  12. Describe a fantasy world. What kind of creatures live in this world? What is the climate like? What everyday challenges would a typical citizen of this world face? You can use this fantasy world name generator for inspiration.
  13. At the flip of a switch, you turn into a dragon. What kind of dragon would you be? Describe your appearance, special abilities, likes and dislikes. You can use a dragon name generator to give yourself a cool dragon name.
  14. Pick your favourite book or a famous story. Now change the point of view. For example, you could rewrite the fairytale, Cinderella. This time around, Prince Charming could be the main character. What do you think Prince Charming was doing, while Cinderella was cleaning the floors and getting ready for the ball?
  15. Pick a random writing prompt and use it to write a short story. Check out this collection of over 300 writing prompts for kids to inspire you.
  16. Write a shopping list for a famous character in history. Imagine if you were Albert Einstein’s assistant, what kind of things would he shop for on a weekly basis?
  17. Create a fake advertisement poster for a random object that is near you right now. Your goal is to convince the reader to buy this object from you.
  18. What is the worst (or most annoying) sound that you can imagine? Describe this sound in great detail, so your reader can understand the pain you feel when hearing this sound.
  19. What is your favourite song at the moment? Pick one line from this song and describe a moment in your life that relates to this line.
  20. You’re hosting an imaginary dinner party at your house. Create a list of people you would invite, and some party invites. Think about the theme of the dinner party, the food you will serve and entertainment for the evening.
  21. You are waiting to see your dentist in the waiting room. Write down every thought you are having at this moment in time.
  22. Make a list of your greatest fears. Try to think of at least three fears. Now write a short story about a character who is forced to confront one of these fears.
  23. Create a ‘Wanted’ poster for a famous villain of your choice. Think about the crimes they have committed, and the reward you will give for having them caught.
  24. Imagine you are a journalist for the ‘Imagine Forest Times’ newspaper. Your task is to get an exclusive interview with the most famous villain of all time. Pick a villain of your choice and interview them for your newspaper article. What questions would you ask them, and what would their responses be?
  25. In a school playground, you see the school bully hurting a new kid. Write three short stories, one from each perspective in this scenario (The bully, the witness and the kid getting bullied).
  26. You just won $10 million dollars. What would you spend this money on?
  27. Pick a random animal, and research at least five interesting facts about this animal. Write a short story centred around one of these interesting facts.
  28. Pick a global issue that you are passionate about. This could be climate change, black lives matters, women’s rights etc. Now create a campaign poster for this global issue.
  29. Write an acrostic poem about an object near you right now (or even your own name). You could use a poetry idea generator to inspire you.
  30. Imagine you are the head chef of a 5-star restaurant. Recently the business has slowed down. Your task is to come up with a brand-new menu to excite customers. Watch this video prompt on YouTube to inspire you.
  31. What is your favourite food of all time? Imagine if this piece of food was alive, what would it say to you?
  32. If life was one big musical, what would you be singing about right now? Write the lyrics of your song.
  33. Create and describe the most ultimate villain of all time. What would their traits be? What would their past look like? Will they have any positive traits?
  34. Complete this sentence in at least 10 different ways: Every time I look out of the window, I…
  35. You have just made it into the local newspaper, but what for? Write down at least five potential newspaper headlines. Here’s an example, Local Boy Survives a Deadly Illness.
  36. If you were a witch or a wizard, what would your specialist area be and why? You might want to use a Harry Potter name generator or a witch name generator for inspiration.
  37. What is your favourite thing to do on a Saturday night? Write a short story centred around this activity.
  38. Your main character has just received the following items: A highlighter, a red cap, a teddy bear and a fork. What would your character do with these items? Can you write a story using these items?
  39. Create a timeline of your own life, from birth to this current moment. Think about the key events in your life, such as birthdays, graduations, weddings and so on. After you have done this, you can pick one key event from your life to write a story about.
  40. Think of a famous book or movie you like. Rewrite a scene from this book or movie, where the main character is an outsider. They watch the key events play out, but have no role in the story. What would their actions be? How would they react?
  41. Three very different characters have just won the lottery. Write a script for each character, as they reveal the big news to their best friend.
  42. Write a day in the life story of three different characters. How does each character start their day? What do they do throughout the day? And how does their day end?
  43. Write about the worst experience in your life so far. Think about a time when you were most upset or angry and describe it.
  44. Imagine you’ve found a time machine in your house. What year would you travel to and why?
  45. Describe your own superhero. Think about their appearance, special abilities and their superhero name. Will they have a secret identity? Who is their number one enemy?
  46. What is your favourite country in the world? Research five fun facts about this country and use one to write a short story.
  47. Set yourself at least three writing goals. This could be a good way to motivate yourself to write every day. For example, one goal might be to write at least 150 words a day.
  48. Create a character description based on the one fact, three fiction rule. Think about one fact or truth about yourself. And then add in three fictional or fantasy elements. For example, your character could be the same age as you in real life, this is your one fact. And the three fictional elements could be they have the ability to fly, talk in over 100 different languages and have green skin.
  49. Describe the perfect person. What traits would they have? Think about their appearance, their interests and their dislikes.
  50. Keep a daily journal or diary. This is a great way to keep writing every day. There are lots of things you can write about in your journal, such as you can write about the ‘highs’ and ‘lows’ of your day. Think about anything that inspired you or anything that upset you, or just write anything that comes to mind at the moment.
  51. Write a book review or a movie review. If you’re lost for inspiration, just watch a random movie or read any book that you can find. Then write a critical review on it. Think about the best parts of the book/movie and the worst parts. How would you improve the book or movie?
  52. Write down a conversation between yourself. You can imagine talking to your younger self or future self (i.e. in 10 years’ time). What would you tell them? Are there any lessons you learned or warnings you need to give? Maybe you could talk about what your life is like now and compare it to their life?
  53. Try writing some quick flash fiction stories. Flash fiction is normally around 500 words long, so try to stay within this limit.
  54. Write a six-word story about something that happened to you today or yesterday. A six-word story is basically an entire story told in just six words. Take for example: “Another football game ruined by me.” or “A dog’s painting sold for millions.” – Six-word stories are similar to writing newspaper headlines. The goal is to summarise your story in just six words.
  55. The most common monsters or creatures used in stories include vampires, werewolves, dragons, the bigfoot, sirens and the loch-ness monster. In a battle of intelligence, who do you think will win and why?
  56. Think about an important event in your life that has happened so far, such as a birthday or the birth of a new sibling. Now using the 5 W’s and 1 H technique describe this event in great detail. The 5 W’s include: What, Who, Where, Why, When and the 1 H is: How. Ask yourself questions about the event, such as what exactly happened on that day? Who was there? Why was this event important? When and where did it happen? And finally, how did it make you feel?
  57. Pretend to be someone else. Think about someone important in your life. Now put yourself into their shoes, and write a day in the life story about being them. What do you think they do on a daily basis? What situations would they encounter? How would they feel?
  58. Complete this sentence in at least 10 different ways: I remember…
  59. Write about your dream holiday. Where would you go? Who would you go with? And what kind of activities would you do?
  60. Which one item in your house do you use the most? Is it the television, computer, mobile phone, the sofa or the microwave? Now write a story of how this item was invented. You might want to do some research online and use these ideas to build up your story.
  61. In exactly 100 words, describe your bedroom. Try not to go over or under this word limit.
  62. Make a top ten list of your favourite animals. Based on this list create your own animal fact file, where you provide fun facts about each animal in your list.
  63. What is your favourite scene from a book or a movie? Write down this scene. Now rewrite the scene in a different genre, such as horror, comedy, drama etc.
  64. Change the main character of a story you recently read into a villain. For example, you could take a popular fairytale such as Jack and the Beanstalk, but this time re-write the story to make Jack the villain of the tale.
  65. Complete the following sentence in at least 10 different ways: Do you ever wonder…
  66. What does your name mean? Research the meaning of your own name, or a name that interests you. Then use this as inspiration for your next story. For example, the name ‘Marty’ means “Servant Of Mars, God Of War”. This could make a good concept for a sci-fi story.
  67. Make a list of three different types of heroes (or main characters) for potential future stories.
  68. If someone gave you $10 dollars, what would you spend it on and why?
  69. Describe the world’s most boring character in at least 100 words.
  70. What is the biggest problem in the world today, and how can you help fix this issue?
  71. Create your own travel brochure for your hometown. Think about why tourists might want to visit your hometown. What is your town’s history? What kind of activities can you do? You could even research some interesting facts.
  72. Make a list of all your favourite moments or memories in your life. Now pick one to write a short story about.
  73. Describe the scariest and ugliest monster you can imagine. You could even draw a picture of this monster with your description.
  74. Write seven haikus, one for each colour of the rainbow. That’s red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.
  75. Imagine you are at the supermarket. Write down at least three funny scenarios that could happen to you at the supermarket. Use one for your next short story.
  76. Imagine your main character is at home staring at a photograph. Write the saddest scene possible. Your goal is to make your reader cry when reading this scene.
  77. What is happiness? In at least 150 words describe the feeling of happiness. You could use examples from your own life of when you felt happy.
  78. Think of a recent nightmare you had and write down everything you can remember. Use this nightmare as inspiration for your next story.
  79. Keep a dream journal. Every time you wake up in the middle of the night or early in the morning you can quickly jot down things that you remember from your dreams. These notes can then be used as inspiration for a short story.
  80. Your main character is having a really bad day. Describe this bad day and the series of events they experience. What’s the worst thing that could happen to your character?
  81. You find a box on your doorstep. You open this box and see the most amazing thing ever. Describe this amazing thing to your readers.
  82. Make a list of at least five possible settings or locations for future stories. Remember to describe each setting in detail.
  83. Think of something new you recently learned. Write this down. Now write a short story where your main character also learns the same thing.
  84. Describe the most beautiful thing you’ve ever seen in your whole life. Your goal is to amaze your readers with its beauty.
  85. Make a list of things that make you happy or cheer you up. Try to think of at least five ideas. Now imagine living in a world where all these things were banned or against the law. Use this as inspiration for your next story.
  86. Would you rather be rich and alone or poor and very popular? Write a story based on the lives of these two characters.
  87. Imagine your main character is a Librarian. Write down at least three dark secrets they might have. Remember, the best secrets are always unexpected.
  88. There’s a history behind everything. Describe the history of your house. How and when was your house built? Think about the land it was built on and the people that may have lived here long before you.
  89. Imagine that you are the king or queen of a beautiful kingdom. Describe your kingdom in great detail. What kind of rules would you have? Would you be a kind ruler or an evil ruler of the kingdom?
  90. Make a wish list of at least three objects you wish you owned right now. Now use these three items in your next story. At least one of them must be the main prop in the story.
  91. Using nothing but the sense of taste, describe a nice Sunday afternoon at your house. Remember you can’t use your other senses (i.e see, hear, smell or touch) in this description.
  92. What’s the worst pain you felt in your life? Describe this pain in great detail, so your readers can also feel it.
  93. If you were lost on a deserted island in the middle of nowhere, what three must-have things would you pack and why?
  94. Particpate in online writing challenges or contests. Here at Imagine Forest, we offer daily writing challenges with a new prompt added every day to inspire you. Check out our challenges section in the menu.

Do you have any more fun creative writing exercises to share? Let us know in the comments below!