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Creative writing midterm quiz

HUM111 Phoenix Week 4 Critical And Creative Thinking Midterm Exam

Appendix A Midterm Exam • • • Access the Week Four Electronic Reserve Readings located under the materials section of your student website. Read, watch, and listen to the media presented on the Boston Tea Party. Write a paragraph of approximately 100 words for each section listed below. 1. Using the critical thinking skills you have gained so far and referring to the materials provided for this assignment, identify two possible strategies that Thomas Hutchinson or Samuel Adams likely used to develop and improve their thinking as those historical events unfolded prior to taking a stand and acting according to their beliefs. First off Samuel Adams was a very intelligent man. One who could see the answer to the problem first. When he had the problem and the answer he used different situations and information to get his solution. These critical skills would have helped with the Bos .
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Creative Writing Midterm Vocab

The way in which the various formal elements of a literary work are organized; the architecture of a story.

  • A style of art or literature in which the work is stripped down to its most essential feature.
  • The revelation of only as much information as is absolutely necessary.

The repetition or echoing of significant elements in a narrative. This can create a sense of unity in the composition and can guide the reasder’s attention to what is important in a text.

The climax or turning point in a literary text, generally preceded by a build-up of tension and followed by resolution.

A movement in the arts beginning in the latter part of the 20th century which is notoriously difficult to define but is often associated, in literature, with the floowing: fragmentation, parody, pastiche

A work of fiction that self-consciously draws attention to itself as a work of fiction. Often associated with postmodernism, but examples of metafiction also occur in many other literary movements.

The use of contrasting characters to intensify the dramatic conflict or to help define each character more precisely

  • The main character in a narrative.
  • The character who opposes or is in conflict with the protagonist, or main character.

Also called “stream of consciousness,” a passage in a narrative that presents the disorganized thoughts and fleeting impressions of a character.

A narrative that seems to pursue a chain of distinct episodes rather than working through one central conflict.

A work of drama or literature that ridicules its subject matter through exaggerated mockery and broad comedy.

A sensational type of drama associated with extremes of emotion and using simplified heroes and villains that represent absolute good and evil.

The central idea contained in a literary work, distinct from but understood through the plot, subject matter, characters, and stylistic devices.

English (ENGLISH)

ARC is an integrated reading and writing course designed to increase students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing abilities and to promote their academic literacy for long-term success. To meet these ends, this course provides a structured, rigorous learning environment that nurtures student engagement through a shared, sustained classroom experience, and it fosters collaboration in a curriculum that respects students’ individuality and humanity and that prepares them to meet college-level expectations. It also encourages students to invest in a network of support services and resources to enhance long-term academic and professional success. There will be extensive reading and analysis of college-level texts, frequent essay-writing, relevant discussion, and collaborative work. The course immediately precedes the General Education Communication sequence of English 101 and 102. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Placement into ARC as determined by the CCC Placement Test, the RTW (Read to Write), successful completion of the course immediately preceding ARC in the course sequence based on departmental, faculty-approved assessment, or Consent of Department.

This course provides additional support to English 101 students who elect it or, based upon the final assessment in English 096 (or an equivalent course), exhibit that they need it. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing appropriate to academic literacy. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

CCCRTW score of 4+, a grade of C or better in ENGLISH 96/INTCOMM 100/BOTH ENGLISH 100 and READING 125, or consent of department. All students enrolled in a section of ENGLISH 97 MUST also register for the corresponding section of ENGLISH 101.

Elements of reading, writing and speaking basic English. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, the course.

ARC is an integrated reading and writing course designed to increase students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing abilities and to promote their academic literacy for long-term success. To meet these ends, this course provides a structured, rigorous learning environment that nurtures student engagement through a shared, sustained classroom experience, and it fosters collaboration in a curriculum that respects students’ individuality and humanity and that prepares them to meet college-level expectations. It also encourages students to invest in a network of support services and resources to enhance long-term academic and professional success. There will be extensive reading and analysis of college-level texts, frequent essay writing, relevant discussions, and collaborative work. This course has strict requirements and high expectations and may only be repeated once. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Grade of C or better in ENGLISH 98 and READING 99, CCCRTW 2+, or COMPASS e-Write (5-6) and Reading (50 or >), or CCC Writing score of 3+ and Reading (50 or >), or Consent of Dept Chair.

Emphasis on individual expression in paragraph form, sentence clarity through knowledge of sentence structure, and correct word forms. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Eligibility for ENGLISH 100, or Grade of C or better in ENGLISH 98, or Consent of Department Chairperson.

Development of critical and analytical skills in writing and reading of expository prose. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Eligibility for ENGLISH 101 based on prior coursework or RTW, ACT, SAT, GED, or HiSET test scores, or Consent of Department Chairperson.

Continuation of English 101. Introduces methods of research and writing of investigative papers. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Fundamentals of basic forms of business correspondence. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, the course.

Letters and reports, methods of collecting and organizing data, and methods of presenting facts and ideas effectively. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Introduction to patterns of writing used in reports and letters for business, industry and technology. The course introduces many different approaches to solving specific communication problems and emphasizes critical thinking skills. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

News reporting and writing, feature writing, makeup and editorial work; discussion of problems of policy and newspaper. Lab work correlated with publication of college newspapers. Students will carry out all the tasks involved in the writing, publication and distribution of the college newspaper. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course. Allowed Repeatable Course: Not more than an accumulated four hours will be counted toward graduation.

Survey of journalism, including news reporting and writing, feature writing, makeup and editorial work, business and advertising problems. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Eligibility for ENGLISH 101 based on prior coursework or CCCRTW, ACT, SAT, GED, or HiSET test scores, or Consent of Department Chairperson.

Scope of modern journalism and dominant theories of communication; influences of the media in today’s society. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Eligibility for ENGLISH 101 based on prior coursework or CCCRTW, ACT, SAT, GED, or HiSET test scores, or Consent of Department Chairperson.

This course provides additional support to English 101 students emphasizing critical reading, academic writing, and standard English grammar. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

Eligibility for ENGLISH 101 based on prior coursework or CCCRTW, ACT, SAT, GED, or HiSET test scores, or Consent of Department Chairperson.

Intensified work in expository and argumentative writing for students who need to improve writing skills for professional careers. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

This class covers the principles of writing for film. The journey from idea conception to script completion will be covered in detail throughout the course. Peer workshops, where scripts written by students are evaluated, will be an important feature of the class. An examination and discussion about screenplays from the canon of American film will also be discussed as a way to demonstrate competence in screenwriting. The students’ final work will involve successful completion of a short film or the first act of a feature film. Writing assignments as appropriate to the discipline are part of the course.

Eligibility for ENGLISH 101 based on prior coursework or CCCRTW, ACT, SAT, GED, or HiSET test scores, or Consent of Department Chairperson.

Descriptive and narrative writing, concentrating on the writing of poetry, drama, and fiction. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.